USS Quillback - History

USS Quillback  - History


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Quillback

(SS-424: dp. 1,570 (surf.), 2,416 (subm.),1. 311'8", b. 27'2"; dr. 15'3"; s. 20 k. (surf.), 9 k. (subm.); cpl. 66; a. 10 21" tt., 1 5", 1 40mm; cl. Balao)

Quillback (SS-424) was laid down by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H., 27 June 1944, launched 1 October 1944 sponsored by Mrs. J. A. Tyree, Jr., and eomrnissioned 29 beeember 1944, Lt. Comdr. R. P. Nicholson in command.

After training at New London and work on an experimental ordnance project at Key West, Quillbaek departed for Pearl Harbor and her maiden war patrol, off the enast of Kyushu. During this patrol (30 May-24 July 1945) she destroyed a Japanese suicide motorboat and rescued one aviator from the water only a half mile from the heavily armed shore. Surrender of the enemy found Quillback refitting for her second patrol at Guam.

Peacetime duties returned Quillback to New London for duty as a unit of Submarine Squadron 2. From 1945 to 1951, she operated with the Submarine Sehool in a training capacity and as an experimental unit of the Naval Underwater Sound Laboratory. In April 1951, Quillbaek departed New I,ondon for a six months tour of duty with the 6th Fleet in Mediterranean waters. In April 1952, she reported to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for decommissioning and conversion.

On 27 February 1953, Quillback was recommissioned and joined the Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet as a streamlined "Guppy" (Greater Underwater Propulsion Power) Submarine. She reported to ComSubRon 4 at Key West, Fla. There in local operations, with occasional trips to Guantanamo Bav, she assisted the Fleet Training Group in Destroyer ASW indoetrination. In 1956, 1957, and 1958 Quillbaek took part in major fleet and NATO exercises in the North Atlantic.

In 1959 Quillback was transferred to Submarine Squadron 12. During 1960 she underwent extensive overhaul at Charleston to improve her offensive capabilities. She deployed to the Mediterranean in October 1961, returning to Key West in February 1962. Operating locally out of Key West from May to October, Quillback was deployed to Guantanamo Bay when the Cuban Quarantine was put into effect and remained there during the first 10 days of the crisis. During 1963 Quillback operated out of Key West and rendered services to the Fleet Training Group at Guantanamo.

Quillback deployed to the Mediterranean for six months in July 1964. Experimental torpedo research and development projects were assigned to Quillbaek in 1965 until she deployed to Guantanamo Bay in June. She continued to operate out of Key West until deploying to the Mediterranean again from Augnst to November 1967. She spent most of 1968 and 196g in the Caribbean. She remains with the Atlantic Fleet into 1970.

Quillback earned one battle star for World War II service.


USS Quillback - History

(SS-424: dp. 1,570 (surf.), 2,416 (subm.),1. 311'8", b. 27'2" dr. 15'3" s. 20 k. (surf.), 9 k. (subm.) cpl. 66 a. 10 21" tt., 1 5", 1 40mm cl. Balao)

Quillback (SS-424) was laid down by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H., 27 June 1944, launched 1 October 1944 sponsored by Mrs. J. A. Tyree, Jr., and eomrnissioned 29 beeember 1944, Lt. Comdr. R. P. Nicholson in command.

After training at New London and work on an experimental ordnance project at Key West, Quillbaek departed for Pearl Harbor and her maiden war patrol, off the enast of Kyushu. During this patrol (30 May-24 July 1945) she destroyed a Japanese suicide motorboat and rescued one aviator from the water only a half mile from the heavily armed shore. Surrender of the enemy found Quillback refitting for her second patrol at Guam.

Peacetime duties returned Quillback to New London for duty as a unit of Submarine Squadron 2. From 1945 to 1951, she operated with the Submarine Sehool in a training capacity and as an experimental unit of the Naval Underwater Sound Laboratory. In April 1951, Quillbaek departed New I,ondon for a six months tour of duty with the 6th Fleet in Mediterranean waters. In April 1952, she reported to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for decommissioning and conversion.

On 27 February 1953, Quillback was recommissioned and joined the Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet as a streamlined "Guppy" (Greater Underwater Propulsion Power) Submarine. She reported to ComSubRon 4 at Key West, Fla. There in local operations, with occasional trips to Guantanamo Bav, she assisted the Fleet Training Group in Destroyer ASW indoetrination. In 1956, 1957, and 1958 Quillbaek took part in major fleet and NATO exercises in the North Atlantic.

In 1959 Quillback was transferred to Submarine Squadron 12. During 1960 she underwent extensive overhaul at Charleston to improve her offensive capabilities. She deployed to the Mediterranean in October 1961, returning to Key West in February 1962. Operating locally out of Key West from May to October, Quillback was deployed to Guantanamo Bay when the Cuban Quarantine was put into effect and remained there during the first 10 days of the crisis. During 1963 Quillback operated out of Key West and rendered services to the Fleet Training Group at Guantanamo.

Quillback deployed to the Mediterranean for six months in July 1964. Experimental torpedo research and development projects were assigned to Quillbaek in 1965 until she deployed to Guantanamo Bay in June. She continued to operate out of Key West until deploying to the Mediterranean again from Augnst to November 1967. She spent most of 1968 and 196g in the Caribbean. She remains with the Atlantic Fleet into 1970.


Beshany, Philip A., Vice Adm., USN (Ret.)

A 1938 graduate of the Naval Academy, Admiral Beshany served in the new light cruiser USS Philadelphia (CL-41) before going into submarines. After duty in the USS S-14 (SS-119), he was executive officer of the fleet boat USS Scamp (SS-277) from 1942 to 1944, participating in seven war patrols. He was then executive officer of the USS Quillback (SS-424) during the Okinawa campaign and the occupation of Japan. He later commanded the submarines USS Billfish (SS-286), USS Burrfish (SS-312), and USS Amberjack (SS-522). Shore tours included postgraduate instruction at Annapolis, repair officer at the submarine base in New London, and duty as head of the prospective commanding officers' course for submarines. While on the ComSubLant staff, he worked closely with the Navy's first nuclear-powered submarines. After graduation from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Admiral Beshany had a tour as commanding officer of the fleet oiler USS Salamonie (AO-26).

In the concluding volume Admiral Beshany discusses his command of Submarine Squadron 4 in the early 1960s during the transition from diesel to nuclear powered subs, duty as chief of staff to Deputy Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet during the tragic period when USS Thresher (SSN-593) was lost, and the ground work involved in setting up facilities for U.S. Polaris submarines in Rota, Spain. Subsequent duties included a staff position with Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe in the mid-1960s and Director of Submarine Warfare during the development phases of the Los Angeles-class attack submarine. In this position Beshany was in the thick of the ongoing technical versus operational argument being waged within the OpNav staff. His next duty as an amphibious group commander gave him a new appreciation of the importance of this special type of warfare and the complexity of joint exercises. The 1970s found Beshany back at the Pentagon, first as Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Fleet Operations and Readiness) and then during the reorganization of the OpNav staff he was made the first Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Submarine Warfare) over the objections of Admiral Rickover. In discussing this period Beshany candidly assesses his boss, Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Elmo Zumwalt. Beshany's final tour was as Commander, U.S. Taiwan Defense Command, a position that gave him cause to question our politically motivated shunning of that country. Admiral Beshany served in this post until his retirement in August 1974.

Transcripts of this oral history are available in many formats including bound volumes, and digital copies.


USS Quillback - History

Frank Elefante served as a LT on the Segundo in 1951. His obituary follows.
Sailor Rest Your Oar.

Frank L. Elefante, 92, of Kailua, Hawaii, passed away Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, at home, after a short battle with cancer. Born June 8, 1922, in Vandergrift, he was the son of James and Barbara Elefante. He was a 1940 graduate of Vandergrift High School and enlisted in the Navy in September 1940. He was selected to attend the U.S. Naval Academy and graduated in 1946 with the class of 1947. He retired from the Navy in 1975 with 35 years of service and settled in Kailua with wife, Sophie. He enjoyed running his own small gardening business, selling sago palms and Samoan coconut plants, growing orchids and vegetables, ballroom dancing, playing poker, traveling, skiing at Lake Tahoe and spending time with family. His wife, the former Sophie Czuszack Elefante, whom he married June 6, 1946, passed away in 2002. He leaves a daughter, Barbara Ware and husband, John, of Pollock Pines, Calif. daugther, Kathryn Nash and husband, Paul, of Lenox, Mass. son, James Elefante and wife, Linda, of North Bend, Wash. grandson, Chad Ware, and great-grandchildren, Avery and Garrison, of Brunswick, Ga. sister, Victoria Calizzi, of Cabot sister, Susan DiMenna, of Apollo and brother, Henry Elefante, of Vandergrift. He was predeceased by his grandson, Ben Ware. Memorial donations may be made in Frank’s name to a veterans organization or hospice of your choice.

He qualified in submarines on the USS Segundo (SS-398) in 1951 and was a CAPT when he left the Navy.


USS Quillback - History

What's In a Name?
Quillback: refers to the long, quill-like first ray on the dorsal fin (the fin on its back)

How Big Do They Get?
How Long Do They Live?
The quillback is our largest carpsucker and can reach 200 mm (20 in) and 2.7 kg (6 lbs). They live for about 10 years, although we know of specimens from Wisconsin as old as 12 years.

What Eats Them?
Young quillbacks undoubtedly are eaten by piscivorous (fish-eating) fishes, but predation on them has not been reported. Small quillbacks often associate with sand and mudflats in larger rivers. So, they are probably preyed upon by herons and eagles. The number of quillbacks taken by humans is very small.

How Do They Reproduce?
We know very little about the spawning times or habitats of quillback in Minnesota. Based on the occurrence of young-of-the-year, we suspect that they spawn fairly late for a sucker species, perhaps in May and June. Ripe males and females have been observed in Ohio streams as late as September, but we have no evidence of such late spawning in Minnesota. According to observations in other states, quillback ascend small streams to spawn over sand and mudflats in slow-moving water. They probably broadcast their eggs over the spawning area and abandon them immediately after spawning. Fully developed juveniles (young-of-the-year) begin to appear in June at about 25 mm (1 in) long.

Conservation and Management
Quillbacks have no special conservation status in Minnesota. They are not abundant in Minnesota but are more common then our other two carpsuckers species. In more southern midwestern states, the quillback is a commercial species of modest value.

MORE FISH !

Permission is granted for the non-commercial educational or scientific use of the text and images on this Web document. Please credit the author or authors listed below.

Photographs by Konrad P. Schmidt
Text by Nicole Paulson & Jay T. Hatch in cooperation with
the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' MinnAqua Aquatic Program

This page developed with funds from the
MinnAqua Program (Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fisheries)
and the
Sport Fish Restoration Program (Fish and Wildlife Service, US Department of the Interior)


Quillback is initially found in his arena near the bottom of 1-4. If the player is not within range, he will slowly wander into the direction he is facing, turning around if meeting a wall or ledge.

If the player is only briefly near the same horizontal level as Quillback or within 4 tiles of him, he will jump instead of rolling, and will try to land on top of the player if they happen to be under him during his jump.

Quillback rolls the player's direction if they are within his range and close enough to his horizontal position for long enough. This roll is capable of destroying tiles in Quillback's way, and anything hit by him during the roll attack will instantly die regardless of health. Quillback will roll for roughly 23 tiles before stopping, although his roll timer will reset if he descends one or more tiles and destroys one in the process.

Quillback is immune to conventional whips and stomping, unless the player has Spike Shoes or the flaming whip gained from wearing a Powerpack. Of note is that when Spike Shoes are equipped, stepping on Quillback's back end will cause him to roll, while stepping on his face will prevent him from moving.


County Honors Joseph Manoogian, Jr., Korean And Vietnam War Veteran, US Navy Submariner Service

submitted by Chris Meyer, Deputy County Executive
The late Joseph Manoogian, Jr., a United States Navy Veteran whose service included maritime service during both the Korean War and Vietnam War, was recognized by Rensselaer County’s Honor-A-Deceased Veteran Committee and County officials on Monday, January 14, 2013, during services at the County Office Building. The son of Armenian genocide survivors who emigrated to the United States in 1920, Manoogian, Jr., entered into service to his nation on March 6, 1950, at the age of 17, one credit shy of receiving his high school diploma. During recruit training, Manoogian, Jr. completed the coursework to be issued his GED and proceeded to volunteer for submariner duty, which required extensive qualification programs.
Throughout a Navy career spanning approximately two decades, Manoogian, Jr., was assigned to sometimes multiple tours aboard a half dozen submarines, including the USS Quillback, the USS Seawolf, the USS Bang, the USS Skipjack, the USS Halfbreak and the USS Sea Leopard. Aboard the world’s second nuclear powered submarine, the USS Seawolf, in 1958, Manoogian, Jr., participated in a record-setting assignment when the ship continued fully submerged operations for 60 days and travelling a distance of 14,500 nautical miles.
Additional tours of note include crossing the equator aboard the same ship during 1961 while in pursuit of the cruise ship Santa Maria which had been seized and was under the control of Portuguese Pirates and, when aboard the USS Sea Leopard during 1969, travelling beneath the ice of the North Pole through the Arctic Circle while operating in the northern hemisphere.
For his honorable service to our nation throughout his Naval career, Manoogian, Jr., was authorized to receive five Good Conduct Awards, multiple Bronze Stars and the National Defense Service Medal. He received more than a half dozen commendations and participated in official visits by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Secretary of Defense James McElroy and Secretary of the Navy Thomas Gates.
After marrying Patricia Jean Brown on July, 4, 1954, Manoogian, Jr., helped to raise a family that included daughters Debra and Karin in the Village of Hoosick Falls while continuing in his service to our nation and later through employment with the United States Postal Service.
“Joseph Manoogian, Jr, dedicated his life to the service of his nation and was highly decorated for his valiant actions,” said Rensselaer County Executive Kathleen M. Jimino. “His service, and the service of the men and women of our armed forces have throughout our nation’s history ensured our freedoms and way of life.”
“Joseph Manoogian was a patriot who provided outstanding service to the U.S. Navy, earning assignments to some of the most important and prominent military assignments during the Cold War. Those assignments included being stationed on the world’s second nuclear submarine, the USS Seawolf, and numerous commendations and awards,” said Chairman of the Legislature Martin Reid.
“Joseph’s twenty-year naval career showed his dedication to serving and protecting his country and his commitment to excellence. Following his military service, Joseph continued to serve the community and raised a large and respected family,” added Vice Chairman of the Legislature Stan Brownell.
In addition to Reid and Brownell the ceremony honoring Joseph Manoogian Jr. was attended by Congressman Paul Tonko, representatives of Congressman Chris Gibson and State Senator Kathleen Marchione, Assemblyman John McDonald and County Legislators Gary Pavlic, Mark Fleming and Edward Manny.

A host of family members, friends and government officials including Rensselaer County Executive Kathleen M. Jimino (standing right of center) and members of the Honor-A-Deceased Veteran Committee are pictured following the ceremony commemorating the life and service of US Navy Submariner Vietnam War Veteran Joseph Manoogian Jr. Photo courtesy of Chris Meyer. -->


Archives

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FORSYTH, Mo. – A big fish and a state-record certificate has made a recent fishing trip to Bull Shoals Lake memorable for Evan Miller.

While bowfishing on May 1, the Indianapolis resident harvested a 6-pound, 10-ounce quillback at Bull Shoals. A quillback is a member of the sucker family that’s found statewide, though it’s most common in the clear prairie streams of central and northeastern Missouri. Miller’s fish set the state record for quillback taken by alternative methods (the old mark was 1 pound, 14 ounces). The fish measured 23 ½ inches in length and had a girth of 16 inches. Miller’s catch was certified on scales at the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Shepherd of the Hills Hatchery in Branson.

The Missouri Department of Conservation's State Record Fish program recognizes an angler’s top achievement – catching the biggest fish of that species in state history. Anglers who have fish that meet the criteria are awarded a plaque and will be entered onto the state record fishing list.

Anglers who catch unusually large fish but fall short of state record weight can get recognition through the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Master Angler Award program .


Contents

Argonaut was laid down at Portsmouth Navy Yard at Kittery, Maine on 28 June 1944. She was launched on 1 October 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Allan R. McCann and commissioned on 15 January 1945, Lieutenant Commander John S. Schmidt in command.

Argonaut held shakedown in the Portsmouth area and in Narragansett Bay and returned briefly to Portsmouth on 27 March for post-shakedown availability. She then sailed on 14 April for Key West, Florida, where she conducted special tests for lighter-than-air craft and training operations with the Fleet Sound School. Argonaut departed the Florida coast on 13 May to transit the Panama Canal en route Hawaii. Reaching Pearl Harbor on 11 June, the submarine spent two weeks in repairs and training exercises before beginning her first war patrol on 28 June.

She made a fuel stop at Saipan on 10 July and then proceeded to the Formosa Strait and the East China and Yellow Seas to search for enemy shipping. On 16 July, Argonaut spotted a downed aviator, picked him up, and later transferred him to Quillback. Her only contact with Japanese vessels during the patrol came on 12 August, when Argonaut sank a 25-ton junk with fire from her 40 mm and 20 mm guns. Since she terminated her patrol at Guam on 21 August, six days after Japan capitulated, this was her only combat action during World War II.

Post-war Edit

Argonaut departed Guam on 1 September and proceeded, via Pearl Harbor and the Panama Canal, to the Naval Frontier Base at Tompkinsville, New York. She arrived in New York on 4 October but continued on to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for an overhaul. Early in 1946, Argonaut was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet and was based at Panama. While en route to Panama, Argonaut collided with light cruiser Honolulu off the United States East Coast between New York City and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during a heavy fog. Honolulu sustained minor damage but Argonaut sustained major damage with 40 feet (12 m) of the bow bent completely around and facing aft. The submarine was in for major repairs for many months at New London, Connecticut. Later in 1946, Argonaut became a unit of Submarine Squadron 2 (SubRon 2) based at New London, Connecticut.

In July 1952, Argonaut underwent a major conversion as part of the Fleet Snorkel program at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, during which she received a snorkel system and a streamlined sail. These changes gave the submarine greater submerged speed and range. Argonaut was one of the few Fleet Snorkel submarines to retain her 5-inch deck gun. The gun was removed by 1957.

Argonaut operated from New London until July 1955, when she was reassigned to SubRon 6 at Norfolk, Virginia. Following this move, Argonaut was converted to a guided missile submarine armed with a Regulus I missile.

In 1958, Argonaut ' s home port was changed to San Juan, Puerto Rico, where she remained for a year, engaged primarily in missile operations as guidance submarine for Regulus missiles. The submarine returned to Norfolk, Virginia in 1959. During an overhaul in early 1960, Argonaut ' s missile equipment was removed. When the alterations were completed, the submarine resumed her routine of supporting antisubmarine warfare (ASW) training operations out of Norfolk. Her commanding officer from 1960 to 1962 was Lieutenant-Commander (LCDR) Earl Resch. [8]

In June 1962, LCDR Theodore A. Curtin became Argonaut ' s commanding officer. [8] On 15 October 1962, Argonaut performed duties in conjunction with the naval quarantine of Cuba. She then had a routine overhaul at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. The yard work was completed on 13 May 1963, and the submarine sailed to the New London area for refresher training. After further training in the Virginia Capes area, she got underway on 19 August for the Mediterranean and service with the 6th Fleet. Her ports of call during the deployment included Gibraltar Suda Bay, Crete Rhodes, Greece İzmir, Turkey Toulon, France Marseille, France Sanremo, Italy and Naples, Italy. The submarine returned to home port on 15 December.

Argonaut continued her routine of operations along the U.S. east coast with periodic deployments to the Mediterranean. LCDR Floyd Holloway [8] became her commanding officer in June 1964 (through 1966). On 1 December 1965 Argonaut commenced overhaul at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. Argonaut left the shipyard on 10 June 1966 for sea trials, and on 20 January headed for New London for refresher training. She then provided services to the submarine school at New London through the remainder of 1966.

The submarine moved to Norfolk early in 1967, but left the Virginia Capes area on 9 January, bound for San Juan, Puerto Rico. Argonaut took part in Operation "Springboard" through the rest of January and most of February before leaving the Caribbean on 23 February to return to Norfolk, arriving there five days later. For the next two months, Argonaut prepared for a North Atlantic and Mediterranean cruise. She sailed on 26 May and made her first port call at Trondheim, Norway. The submarine also visited Cuxhaven, Germany Leith, Scotland Rota, Spain Naples, Italy and Valletta, Malta, before returning to her home port on 20 September. She remained in the local operating area through the duration of the year.

The submarine traveled to New London on 6 February 1968, entered drydock there on 9 February, and remained in it through 26 February. Argonaut left the keelblocks on 27 February and returned to Norfolk. She made a patrol in the Jacksonville, Florida operating area in mid-March and put in at Port Everglades, Florida on 22 March. Three days later the submarine got underway for her home port. Upon her arrival in Norfolk on 29 March, she assumed a schedule of local operations. This was interrupted by another cruise to Port Everglades in October. She returned that month to Norfolk and began preparations for deactivation. Argonaut was decommissioned on 2 December, and her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register that same day.

In 1968 Argonaut was put up for sale by the United States. Offered to the Royal Canadian Navy, the US Navy gave Maritime Command five weeks to decide if they wanted the submarine. [9] Argonaut was similar to the submarine already on loan from the United States, HMCS Grilse, but significantly upgraded. The purchase was approved after Maritime Command claimed that Grilse was no longer fit for service and Canada needed a replacement for training purposes. [9] [10]

Canada purchased the hull outright for $153,000 and modernized the submarine at Esquimalt, British Columbia for $2.5 million. In November 1968 the submarine was prepared for departure from Norfolk, Virginia. Argonaut was in poor condition however, with only one of her four diesel engines in working condition, her electrical generator unusable and the boat was leaking. [9]

The boat was commissioned on 2 December 1968 as HMCS Rainbow (SS 75) and sailed for Esquimalt with only two engines working. [9] [11] The submarine caught fire twice while en route to British Columbia and upon arrival, was refused entry into port due to unpaid taxes and customs on her purchase. Once the government had paid the $12,000 owing, Rainbow entered Esquimalt and began her refit. The modernization took eight months to complete and following its completion, Rainbow took up the duties of the out-of-service Grilse of performing anti-submarine warfare training on the West Coast. [9]

Rainbow was decommissioned on 31 December 1974 due to budget cuts and her need for a refit. [12] [13] Maritime Command kept the submarine in reserve, laid up until 1976, hoping to return her to service. However, in 1976, the boat was returned to the United States and scrapped at Portland, Oregon in 1977 for $213,687. [12]

There is a detailed 1/100th scale model of Argonaut in the Submarine Force Museum in Groton, Connecticut.


USS Quillback - History

Chief Melvin Tolbert Smith, STC (SS) USN-RET of Gassville, Ark. sailed his last journey on November 15, 2015, to be with his Lord. Burial will be in the Fayetteville National Cemetery in Fayetteville, Ark.
Mel was born January 2, 1926, in Lowell, Ark. to Edward and Goldie Clark Smith. He joined the US NAVY Submarine Service at 17. Mel served on the USS Snapper, USS Quillback, USS Sennett, USS Sea Fox, and the USS Sea Leopard before joining the Navy's historical service, the HS 7 Anti-Submarine Squadron. Before retiring from the Navy in 1962, he spent two years as a Navy Recruiter at Ontario, Oregon. Mel married Mary Nida in 1983. He is a lifetime member of the USSVI Submarine Veterans Inc. (Holland Club), the former Vice Commander of USS submarine Veterans Base, Mountain Home, Ark., and former member of the Idaho Spuds-Regions-Idaho/Montana/Oregon/ Washington. Mel is survived by his wife, Mary Nida Smith of Gassville, Ark. brother, Joseph "Jody" (Barbara) Smith of Nampa, Idaho step-children, Margeret Bensching (Lee) Hoekstra of Naperville, Ill. and Wesley Len Bensching of Nampa, Idaho grandchildren, Christopher (Shanna) Hoekstra of Sioux Falls, S.D., Melissa Hoekstra (Brian) Hecht, Nicole Hoekstra and four great-grandchildren of Sioux Falls, S.D. as well as many nephews, nieces, great-nephews and great-nieces of Idaho and Washington.
Memorials may be made to United States Submarine Veterans Inc., USSVI Twin Lakes Base, Mountain Home, Ark. 72653 or Donald W. Reynolds Library. Arrangements are by Kirby & Family Funeral & Cremation Services. Please visit our online guestbook and obituary at kirbyandfamily.com.

Published November 20, 2015

OBITUARY SUBMITTED BY:
Kirby-Boaz Funeral Home
600 Hospital Drive, Mountain Home, AR
Phone: 870-425-6978


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