William of Jumieges

William of Jumieges


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William of Jumieges was born in Normandy in about 1025. He became a Benedictine monk at Jumieges. In about 1070 he compiled a history of the Norman rulers, The Deeds of the Dukes of Normandy. The book started with the story of Rollo the Ganger and ended with William the Conqueror. The book was based on William's reading of existing manuscripts plus his own knowledge and observations.

When William finished the book he sent a copy to William the Conqueror. He also sent a letter which explained that the main purpose of the book was to demonstrate that William was the rightful king of England. William of Jumieges died in about 1090.

Edward, king of the English, lacking an heir sent Duke Harold, the greatest of all the earls to swear fealty to William, Duke of Normandy concerning Edward's crown. Harold remained with the duke for some time, and swore fealty concerning the kingdom with many oaths, before being sent back to the king laden with gifts.

William, Duke of Normandy, never allowed himself to be deterred from any enterprise because of the labour it entailed. He was strong in body and tall in stature. He was moderate in drinking, for he deplored drunkenness in all men. In speech he was fluent and persuasive, being skilled at all times in making clear his will. He followed the Christian discipline in which he had been brought up from childhood, and whenever his health permitted he regularly attended Christian worship each morning and at the celebration of mass.

The peasants wanted to make use of the woods, forests and waters. Each assembly of English people appointed two deputies who were to meet in order to press their case. But William, Duke of Normandy, learning of this, promptly sent a group of soldiers to scatter the peasant gathering. They arrested all the deputies and some other peasants, having first chopped off their hands and feet, they sent them back home to their families, helpless for the rest of their lives.


William of Jumièges

Benedictine historian of the eleventh century. Practically nothing seems to be known of his life except that he was apparently a Norman by birth and became a monk at the royal abbey of Jumièges, in Normandy, where he died about 1090. His only claim to fame consists in his "Historia Normannorum", in eight books, which is the chief authority for the history of the Norman people from 851 to 1137. One of the earliest manuscripts of this work still extant was preserved at Rousen up to the Revolution and is now in the Bibliothèque Nationale at Paris. The first four books of the "Historia" were taken from an earlier work on the same subject, written by Dudon of St. Quentin, whose labours are praised by William. The verdict of more recent times, however, with regard to Dudon, is that he was given to romancing and that his work was not particularly reliable. Many of his exaggerations have been modified and corrected by William, who made full use of all that was trustworthy in his predecessor's account. Only seven out of the eight books of the "Historia" are from William's own hand, comprising events down to the year 1087. The eighth book, continuing the history as far as the death of Boson, Abbot of Bec, which occurred in 1137, was added by an anonymous author, although his continuation is usually printed as an integral part of the complete work. Ordericus Vitalis drew largely from William's history for the portions of his work that deal with the Normans, as did also Thomas Walsingham in his "Ypodigma neustriae". The "Historia Normannorum" was first edited and printed at Frankfurt in 1603 and is also included in Camden's collection of English and Norman historians. The style is considered passable for the age in which the writer lived, though it does not come up to the requirements of modern criticism.


William of Jumieges

William of Jumièges (Guillaume de Jumièges) was a contemporary of the events of 1066, and one of our earliest writers on the subject of the Norman Conquest. He is himself a "shadowy figure", only known by his dedicatory letter to King William as a monk of Jumièges. "Since he also mentions that he was an eyewitness of some events from the reign of Richard III (1026-7), it seems reasonable to assume that he was born some time about the year 1000. He probably entered the monastery during the first quarter of the eleventh century and received his education from Thierry de Mathonville." According to Orderic Vitalis, William's nickname was "Calculus". The meaning behind this nickname is unknown. His death, post 1070, is unrecorded. He was a Norman writing from a Norman point of view. Although only a monk with evidently no military training, he wrote with pride in the accomplishments of his people.

William of Jumièges was the original compiler of the history known as The Gesta Normannorum Ducum ("Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans"), written in about 1070. This was built upon the framework of an earlier history compiled by Dudo of Saint-Quentin, De moribus et actis primorum Normannorum ducum, between c. 996 and c. 1015. This work was commissioned by Duke Richard I, and "was renewed by his half-brother, Count Rodulf of Ivry, and his son Duke Richard II (996 - 1026). Dudo's work was taken up by William of Jumièges in the 1050's, who revised, abbreviated and updated his De moribus and added an account of the reigns of Dukes Richard II, Richard III (1026-7), Robert I (1027-35), and William II." He finished this by 1060, but added to it later when William the Conqueror had become king of England, bringing events up to 1070. The Gesta Normannorum Ducum was later expanded by the 12th century monkish chroniclers, Orderic Vitalis and Robert of Torigni.


William of Jumièges

Benedictine historian of the eleventh century. Practically nothing seems to be known of his life except that he was apparently a Norman by birth and became a monk at the royal abbey of Jumièges, in Normandy, where he died about 1090. His only claim to fame consists in his "Historia Normannorum", in eight books, which is the chief authority for the history of the Norman people from 851 to 1137. One of the earliest manuscripts of this work still extent was preserved at Rousen up to the Revolution and is now in the Bibliothèque Nationale at Paris. The first four books of the "Historia" were taken from an earlier work on the same subject, written by Dudon of St. Quentin, whose labours are praised by William. The verdict of more recent times, however, with regard to Dudon, is that he was given to romancing and that his work was not particularly reliable. Many of his exaggerations have been modified and corrected by William, who made full use of all that was trustworthy in his predecessor's account. Only seven out of the eight books of the "Historia" are from William's own hand, comprising events down to the year 1087. The eighth book, continuing the history as far as the death of Boson, Abbot of Bec, which occurred in 1137, was added by an anonymous author, although his continuation is usually printed as an integral part of the complete work. Ordericus Vitalis drew largely from William's history for the portions of his work that deal with the Normans, as did also Thomas Walsingham in his "Ypodigma neustriae". The "Historia Normannorum" was first edited and printed at Frankfurt in 1603 and is also included in Camden's collection of English and Norman historians. The style is considered passable for the age in which the writer lived, though it does not come up to the requirements of modern criticism.

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A forestry and farming village situated in a meander of the river Seine, some 21 kilometres (13 mi) west of Rouen, at the junction of the D 65 and the D 143 roads. A ferry service operates here, connecting the commune with the south and west sides of the river.

  • The church of St. Valentin, dating from the eleventh century. [3]
  • The ruins of the tenth-century church of St.Pierre (part of the abbey) [4]
  • An eighteenth-century chapel. [5]
  • Several lesser buildings dating from the eleventh century.

Jumièges Abbey Edit

It is best known as the site of Jumièges Abbey, a typical Norman abbey of the Romanesque period, and the home of the pro-Norman chronicler William of Jumièges who wrote the Gesta Normannorum Ducum about 1070. Ruined in the first quarter of the 19th century, the abbey dates from the 7th century. [4] The church of Notre Dame was consecrated in 1067 in the presence of William the Conqueror [6]

  1. ^"Répertoire national des élus: les maires". data.gouv.fr, Plateforme ouverte des données publiques françaises (in French). 2 December 2020.
  2. ^
  3. "Populations légales 2018". INSEE. 28 December 2020.
  4. ^Base Mérimée: Eglise Saint-Valentin, Ministère français de la Culture. (in French)
  5. ^ abBase Mérimée: Abbaye de Bénédictins Saint-Pierre dite Abbaye de Jumièges, Ministère français de la Culture. (in French)
  6. ^Base Mérimée: Chapelle de la-Mère-de-Dieu, Ministère français de la Culture. (in French)
  7. ^
  8. Le Maho, Jacques (2001). Jumièges Abbey. Monum, Éditions du patrimoine. 2-85822-397-1.

This Rouen geographical article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.


Jumièges Abbey -

Founded in the 7th century, Jumièges Abbey became a very prestigious abbey favoured by the Carolingian kings. It was therefore the target of the Vikings who pillaged and burned it in 841. However, the history of the abbey also illustrates in a striking manner the success of the integration of the Normans in the Frankish Kingdom. In 942, the son of Rollon, the very Christian William Longsword (933-942) restore monastic life by sending for the monks of Poitiers. The founder dukes of the Norman state, Richard I (942-996) and Richard II (996-1026), favour Jumièges and entrusts it to a disciple of the Italian reformer Guillaume de Volpiano, himself sent for at Fécamp. It is finally William the Conqueror who, in the following generation, will make of Jumièges a manifesto of Norman splendour.

Well located on the bends of the Seine downstream of Rouen, between London and Paris, Jumièges also had a strong relationship with England befor1066. Robert Champart, Abbot of Jumièges became Bishop of London in 1045 and, with the support of Edward the Confessor, returned from his exile at the court of the Duke of Normandy to become King of England in 1042. This relationship explains the presence of important manuscripts influenced by the Anglo-Saxon miniature in the scriptorium at Jumièges.

The abbey has the distinctive feature of containing two churches of which the most ancient, Saint-Pierre, perhaps shows traces of walls destroyed by the Vikings and restored in 942. But Jumièges is above all known for the stately ruins of the Church of Notre-Dame begun in 1040, at the very beginning of the reign of William and consecrated in 1067. Of grandiose proportions, the Church of Notre-Dame is amongst the more important architectural buildings of the era of William of Normandy. It brings together the souvenir of imperial Carolingian architecture, revitalised in the Ottonian Germanic Empire, with the innovations of the Romanesque era, as many elements used in Norman architecture in England where they form in their turn an "imperial" programme specific to the Norman kings


Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)/William of Jumièges

Benedictine historian of the eleventh century. Practically nothing seems to be known of his life except that he was apparently a Norman by birth and became a monk at the royal abbey of Jumièges, in Normandy, where he died about 1090. His only claim to fame consists in his "Historia Normannorum", in eight books, which is the chief authority for the history of the Norman people from 851 to 1127. One of the earliest manuscripts of this work still extent was preserved at Rousen up to the Revolution and is now in the Bibliothèque Nationale at Paris. The first four books of the "Historia" were taken from an earlier work on the same subject, written by Dudon of St. Quentin, whose labours are praised by William. The verdict of more recent times, however, with regard to Dudon,, is that he was given to romancing and that his work was not particularly reliable. Many of his exaggerations have been modified and corrected by William, who made full use of all that was trustworthy in his predecessor's account. Only seven out of the eight books of the "Historia" are from William's own hand, comprising events down to the year 1087. The eighth book, continuing the history as far as the death of Boson, Abbot of Bec, which occurred in 1137, was added by an anonymous author, although his continuation is usually printed as an integral part of the complete work. Ordericus Vitalis drew largely from William's history for the portions of his work that deal with the Normans, as did also Thomas Walsingham inn his "Ypodigma neustriae". The "Historia Normannorum" was first edited and printed at Frankfurt in 1603 and is also included in Camden's collection of English and Norman historians. The style is considered passable for the age in which the writer lived, though it does not come up to the requirements of modern criticism.


William of Jumieges

William of Jumieges (surnamed CALCULUS), Benedictine historian of the eleventh century. Practically nothing seems to be known of his life except that he was apparently a Norman by birth and became a monk at the royal abbey of Jumieges, in Normandy, where he died about 1090. His only claim to fame consists in his “Historia Normannorum”, in eight books, which is the chief authority for the history of the Norman people from 851 to 1137. One of the earliest manuscripts of this work still extant was preserved at Rouen up to the Revolution and is now in the Bibliotheque Nationale at Paris. The first four books of the “Historia” were taken from an earlier work on the same subject, written by Dudon of St. Quentin, whose labors are praised by William. The verdict of more recent times, however, with regard to Dudon, is that he was given to romancing and that his work was not particularly reliable. Many of his exaggerations have been modified and corrected by William, who made full use of all that was trustworthy in his predecessor’s account. Only seven out of the eight books of the “Historia” are from William’s own hand, comprising events down tothe year 1087. The eighth book, continuing the history as far as the death of Boson, Abbot of Bee, which occurred in 1137, was added by an anonymous author, although his continuation is usually printed as an integral part of the complete work. Ordericus Vitalis drew largely from William’s history for the portions of his work that deal with the Normans, as did also Thomas Walsingham in his “Ypodigma neustriae” The “Historia Normannorum” was first edited and printed at Frankfort in 1603 and is also included in Camden’s collection of English and Norman historians. The style is considered passable for the age in which the writer lived, though it does not come up to the requirements of modern criticism.


William of Jumièges

11 th century. Normandy. Monk of the abbey of Jumièges. Nothing is known of William of Jumièges except that about 1050 he started his Gesta Normannorum Ducum, a seven-book history of Normandy from the earliest Viking leaders to William the Conqueror, to whom he addressed the dedicatory epistle. Books 1-4, dealing with Hasting, Rollo, William Longsword and Richard I, are an abridged version of Dudo &aposs De moribus . Books 5-7 recount the reigns of Richard II, Richard III, Robert the Magnificent and William the Conqueror, based largely on &hellip

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