USS Paul Jones (DD-10)

USS Paul Jones (DD-10)


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USS Paul Jones (DD-10)

USS Paul Jones (DD-10) was the name ship of the Paul Jones class of destroyers. Before the outbreak of the First World War she served with the Pacific Fleet, before after US entry into the war she moved to the Atlantic coast.

The Paul Jones was laid down on 20 April 1899, launched on 14 June 1902 and commissioned on 19 July 1903. She was named after John Paul Jones, the most famous American naval hero of the War of Independence.

Between 1903 and the US entry into the First World War the Paul Jones served with the Pacific Fleet, and was based at San Francisco. Anyone serving on her between 25-28 April 1914 or 18 July-22 August 1916 and 1 December 1916 to 29 January 1917 qualified for the Mexican Service Medal.

After the American entry into the First World War she sailed for Norfolk Virginia, arriving on 3 August. From 4-13 August she patrolled off the York River.

In mid-August 1917 she was one of eight destroyers that escorted the Battleship Force Atlantic as it moved between Bermuda and New York.

Between 24 August and 24 September she carried out a series of convoy escort patrols off the east coast. She spent most of October-December training around Norfolk and Chesapeake Bay.

On 15 January 1918, along with USS Stewart (DD-13), USS Hopkins (DD-6) and USS Worden (DD-16), she set off from Philadelphia at the start of a journey to the Azores. Soon after leaving Bermuda she developed a serious leak in her port aft coal bunker. Her aft fire rooms were flooded, and all of her fresh water was contaminated. She was only just able to make progress on the power from the remaining two boilers, and it took from 23-26 January for her to reach safety back at Bermuda. After temporary repairs she left Bermuda on 22 February and sailed to Philadelphia, where she underwent permanent repairs between 25 February and mid April.

On 18 April 1918 the Paul Jones began a period of operations in the Chesapeake Bay area, operating from Fortress Monroe, Virginia. This lasted until 6 August. On 2 July, while operating from Fortress Monroe, she rescued 1,250 Marines and officers from the burning transport ship USS Henderson (AP-1), and moved them to the Von Steuben (Id.3017), a former German auxiliary cruiser that had been interned while the United States was neutral and seized after the American entry into the war. The destroyer USS Mayrant (DD-31) also took part in the rescue. The Henderson was saved and later transported 10,000 US veterans back home from Europe.

On 7 August the Paul Jones was involved in a friendly fire incident while escorting a convoy. The USS Submarine 0-6 (SS-67) was mistake for a U-boat and came under fire from the Paul Jones and several other escorts. The submarine's conning tower was hit seven times before she was correctly identified. The Paul Jones had the task of escorting the damaged submarine back to Delaware Bay.

On 9 August she moved to her new base at Hampton Roads. She continued to operate around Chesapeake Bay, performing a mix of duties including anti-mine patrols and convoy escort duties. This lasted until the start of 1919, when like all other coal powered destroyers she was selected to be scrapped.

She was decommissioned on 29 July 1919, struck off the Naval Vessel Register on 15 September and sold for scrap on 3 January 1920.

Displacement (standard)

480t

Top Speed

29kts

Engine

4 Thornycroft boilers
2 Vertical Triple Expansion engines
2 shafts
8,000ihp

Length

250ft 7in

Width

23ft 6in

Armaments

Two 3in/25 guns
Five 6pdr guns
Two 18in torpedo tubes

Crew complement

73

Launched

14 June 1902

Completed

14 December 1903

Fate

Sold 1920

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


U.S.S. JOHN PAUL JONES

USS John Paul Jones received its name in honor of Captain John Paul Jones, a Navy hero from the American Revolution. The Navy brought her into service upon her commission in April 1921. For the first couple of years, she participated in various Atlantic operations. In 1923, she transferred to duty in the Pacific. For the next couple of decades, USS John Paul Jones served with the Asiatic Fleet patrolling the Chinese coast. She patrolled the waters of the Yangtze River as well. When the Second World War broke out, her first assignment was part of a picket patrol near Java.

In January 1942, USS John Paul Jones met up with Dutch naval forces. She went on patrol for a submarine that had sunk two Dutch vessels. She, along with other destroyers and cruisers, successfully engaged a massive Japanese convoy in late January. In late February, USS John Paul Jones participated in the Battle of the Java Sea. In May of that year, she set sail for the West Coast. There she took up convoy duties between California and Hawaii for the next couple of years. In May 1944, she reported to the East Coast where she took up convoy runs to Europe, provided training to new submarines, and served as cover for a tanker group. The Navy decommissioned her in November 1945 and sold her for scrap in October 1947.


John Paul Jones, second of the initial class destroyers of post-war design, conducted exhaustive shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after which she departed for a cruise to Northern Europe and the British Isles. During this voyage Commander Hayler and members of the crew visited the birthplace of John Paul and presented the ship's emblem to the people of Kirkcudbright. She returned to her home port, Newport, 8 October 1956.

The new destroyer departed for her first cruise with Sixth Fleet 25 March 1957. In May she took part in an operation in support of King Hussein of Jordan. After successfully averting his overthrow, John Paul Jones sailed for Newport once more, arriving 6 June 1957. NATO maneuvers in the North Atlantic followed in October. After another brief cruise to the Mediterranean, she arrived Fall River 27 November and in January 1958 she took part in fleet exercises in the Caribbean.

In the spring of 1958 John Paul Jones operated with Canadian ships on training maneuvers in the Atlantic. After further training off the East Coast and in the Caribbean, she sailed again for the Mediterranean 17 March 1959. This tour with the 6th Fleet on its peace-keeping mission ended 24 July when the ship arrived Boston.

The year 1960 began with 2nd Fleet operations out of Newport, and in June the destroyer embarked midshipmen for a training cruise. She then departed 22 August for a cruise to South America. As part of Operation Unitas, she circumnavigated the continent, visiting many of America's southern allies and taking part in joint exercises with their navies. After transiting the Straits of Magellan and the Panama Canal, John Paul Jones returned to Newport 13 December 1960. During 1961 and 1962 the ship carried out antisubmarine exercises in the Caribbean and out of Newport. In April 1962 she took part in a fleet review and weapons demonstration for President John F. Kennedy, and in July she again embarked midshipmen for training. In October 1962 the ship was on station with the Atlantic Recovery Forces during the orbital flight of Commander Wally Schirra, and soon afterward moved off the coast of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

The following year saw the veteran ship embark on another Mediterranean cruise 6 February to 1 July the remainder of 1963 was spent on antisubmarine exercises in the Atlantic.

Operations along the Atlantic Coast continued until John Paul Jones began another 6th Fleet deployment 20 June 1964. She operated primarily in the western Mediterranean, on ASW assignments until returning home 3 September 1964. Early in 1965 she participated in Operation "Spring board" in the Caribbean. In March the destroyer received a Gemini-recovery crane and on the 19th sailed for her recovery station some 200 miles south of Bermuda. She was to pick up astronauts Major Virgil Grissom and Lt. Cmdr. John W. Young and their space craft in the event that they ended their flight after two rather than the three scheduled orbits. However, all went well so she returned to Norfolk 27 March without headlines.

John Paul Jones headed back to the Mediterranean 18 June for NATO exercises with units of the French, Greek and British navies.

John Paul Jones was converted to a guided missile destroyer at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard between 20 December 1965 and 15 March 1967 and designated DDG-32.

John Paul Jones was a member of the U. S. Pacific Fleet when she was decommissioned on 15 December 1982. She was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 30 November 1985 and sunk as a target off the coast of California on 31 January 2001.


USS Paul Jones (DD-10) - History

Paul Jones initially served in the Pacific Fleet, with a home port at San Francisco. A unit of the Pacific Torpedo Fleet, she was at San Francisco at the beginning of World War I.

Paul Jones sailed 23 April 1917 for Norfolk, Virginia via San Diego, Acapulco, the Canal Zone and Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, arriving 3 August. On 4 August she took station off the York River on patrol assignment until joining Duncan (No. 46), Henley (No. 39), Truxtun (No. 14), Stewart (No. 13), Preble (No. 12), Hull (No. 7), Macdonough (No. 9) and Hopkins (No. 6) as escorts for Battleship Force Atlantic, on 13 August, for passage to Bermuda and New York.

Paul Jones departed the Brooklyn Navy Yard on 24 August and reported to Newport, where she began a series of convoy patrols up and down the coast, returning on 24 September. She then commenced training operations in conjunction with other duties off Norfolk, Lynnhaven Roads and Chesapeake Bay, prior to reporting to Philadelphia 20 December.

On 15 January 1918, in company with Stewart, Hopkins and Worden (No. 16), Paul Jones sailed for the Azores by way of Bermuda. After departing Bermuda, she had to request permission to turn back due to a serious leak in her port after bunker. From 23&ndash26 January, Paul Jones&rsquo crew struggled magnificently against great odds and succeeded in saving the ship from sinking. Wallowing in stormy seas with her after fire room flooded, barely able to maintain headway, losing all drinking and feed water and steaming under two boilers with salt feed, manning bucket brigades for lack of operable pumps, and receiving no answers to her distress signals, she finally sighted a light at St. David&rsquos Head, Bermuda, signaled the battery there for assistance and dropped anchor.

Paul Jones had an exhausted but very happy crew. She remained at Bermuda until 22 February for repairs and then sailed for Philadelphia escorted by Mars (AC-6), arriving 25 February. Following permanent repair at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Paul Jones reported to Fortress Monroe, Virginia on 18 April and performed various duties in and around Chesapeake Bay until 6 August.

The highlight of Paul Jones&rsquo career came on 2 July when Henderson was afire in the Atlantic north of Bermuda and east of Virginia. Paul Jones made four trips from the burning ship to Von Steuben, saving 1,250 Marines and officers together with over 50 tons of luggage. The next day she accompanied Henderson to the Delaware Breakwater.

While in convoy 7 August at sea, Paul Jones with several other ships in her group mistook the US submarine O-6 (SS-67) for an enemy submarine and fired upon her. The submarine was struck seven times in the conning tower before the mistake was apparent. Paul Jones escorted the damaged submarine to Delaware Bay, and arrived at the breakwater the following day.

On 9 August, Paul Jones reported at Hampton Roads and remained in and around Chesapeake Bay conducting mine patrols, convoy duties and other services until slated for inactivation on 31 January 1919. She decommissioned on 29 July 1919, was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 15 September 1919 and was sold on 3 January 1920 to Joseph G. Hitner, Philadelphia, who subsequently scrapped her.


USS Paul Jones (DD-10) - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

Launched on 2 September and commissioned on 30 December 1920, the JOHN D. FORD (DD-228) joined the Asiatic Fleet in August 1922. Operating out of Manila, she cruised from southern China to northern Japan. In June 1924, she protected American lives and interests threatened by civil unrest in Shanghai, China, and in March 1927, covered the evacuation of American and foreign nationals from Nanking. The FORD remained in Chinese waters and following Japanese aggression in northern China in July 1937, she evacuated Americans from Peiping. After war broke out in Europe in September 1939, she began neutrality patrols in the Philippine and South China Seas.

On 10 December 1940, the FORD and POPE (DD-225) were patrolling in the Manila area when the Japanese made their devastating air raid on Manila Bay. The two destroyers sailed southward the same day to join DesRon 29 patrolling the Makassar Strait off Borneo. On 20 January 1942, the Japanese invaded Borneo at Balikpapan. The FORD was one of six destroyers that joined the light cruisers BOISE (CL-47) and MARBLEHEAD (CL-12) to form an ill-fated strike force to confront the enemy. Steaming into the Makassar Strait, the BOISE hit a dagger-sharp rock protrusion and had to turn back. With her went the MARBLEHEAD, which was having engineering problems, and two destroyers to serve as escorts. They left the veteran four-pipers POPE, PARROTT (DD-218), PAUL JONES (DD-230), and FORD to meet a dozen Japanese destroyers, a light cruiser, and several smaller armed vessels.

Around midnight on 24 January, the four destroyers sped toward Balikpapan with its harbor full of Japanese transports. Smoke from oil refineries blown up earlier in a Dutch air attack covered the approach of the destroyers who launched a sweeping torpedo raid against transports anchored off the entrance to Balikpapan Harbor. The destroyers' first ten torpedoes missed their targets. The fault lay with the torpedoes, not the destroyermen who gamely circled for another run. Alerted to their presence, a squadron of Japanese destroyers steamed out of Balikpapan and into Makassar Strait mistakenly searching for a submarine they believed was attacking the transports. Meanwhile, as the four-stackers ran through the anchorage, their torpedoes finally found targets. Before retiring to Soerabaja from the first U.S. surface action in the Pacific war, they sank four enemy transports and one patrol boat. One of the ships was a victim of the FORD's torpedoes. The only casualties were four wounded in the FORD.

On 3 February, the enemy began air raids on Soerabaja, and the FORD retired in convoy to Tjilatjap on the southern coast of Java. Two weeks later, the FORD and POPE, with the Dutch cruisers DE RUYTER and JAVA and the destroyer PIET HIEN of the American-British-Dutch-Australian (ABDA) Strike Force steamed to Badoeng Strait to engage an enemy destroyer-transport force. At 2200 on the night of 19-20 February, the Dutch and American destroyers began their torpedo attack. Within minutes, the PIET HIEN was hit and sunk, and the FORD and POPE were engaged in a running torpedo and gun battle with the Japanese destroyers OSHIO and ASASHIO. In the smoke-filled melee, no one registered a hit, and at 2310 the Americans retired from the fray. During the battle, the FORD had jettisoned a motor whaleboat, which provided the means for thirty-three survivors of the PIET HIEN to reach safety.

On 21 February, the FORD and POPE picked up eighteen torpedoes from the BLACK HAWK (AD-9) and steamed to Soerabaja, arriving the 24th to join the dwindling ABDA Strike Force. Shortages of fuel, ammunition, and torpedoes and considerable battle damage had left the Allies in a critical situation. Only four U.S. destroyers remained fully operational.

Late on the 27th, the FORD, JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216), PAUL JONES, and ALDEN (DD-211) sortied with an Allied force of five cruisers and five other destroyers to search for the enemy in the Java Sea. At 1600 they were under air attack and as they ran northward in the Java Sea, they came upon a large invasion force of four cruisers and thirteen destroyers. At 1616 the Japanese fired the opening salvoes of a furious seven-hour running battle marked by intermittent gun and torpedo duels. The FORD emerged from the battle undamaged, but in the valiant attempt to prevent the invasion of Java, five Allied ships were sunk. Out of torpedoes and low on ammunition, the FORD and the three American destroyers left Soerabaja for Australia on 28 February. En route, they managed to outrun three enemy destroyers guarding the Bali Strait and reached Freemantle on 4 March.

Convoy escort duty and antisubmarine patrols in the Pacific and Atlantic took the FORD into 1944. While cruising west of the Azores on 16 January, the destroyer helped sink the German submarine U-554, and at Gibraltar on 29 March, she was damaged in a collision with a British tanker but was soon back on convoy duty. Reclassified as miscellaneous auxiliary ship AG-119 in July 1945, the JOHN D. FORD was decommissioned on 2 November 1945 and was sold for scrap in October 1947.

From The Tin Can Sailor , April 2001


Copyright 2002 Tin Can Sailors.
All rights reserved.
This article may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from
Tin Can Sailors.


World War I

Paul Jones sailed on 23 April 1917 for Norfolk, Virginia via San Diego, California, Acapulco, the Panama Canal Zone, and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, arriving on 3 August. On 4 August, she took station off the York River on patrol assignment until joining Duncan, Henley, Truxtun, Stewart, Preble, Hull, Macdonough, and Hopkins as escorts for Battleship Force Atlantic, on 13 August, for passage to Bermuda and New York.

Paul Jones departed the Brooklyn Navy Yard on 24 August and reported to Newport, Rhode Island where she began a series of convoy patrols up and down the coast and returning to Newport on 24 September. She then commenced training operations, in conjunction with other duties, off Norfolk, Lynnhaven Roads, and Chesapeake Bay, prior to reporting to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 20 December.

On 15 January 1918, in company with Stewart, Hopkins and Worden, Paul Jones sailed for the Azores by way of Bermuda. After departing Bermuda, she had to request permission to turn back due to a serious leak in her port after bunker. From 23-26 January, Paul Jones ' crew struggled against great odds and succeeded in saving the ship from sinking. Wallowing in stormy seas with her after fire room flooded, barely able to maintain headway, losing all drinking and feed water and steaming under two boilers with salt feed, manning bucket brigades for lack of operable pumps, and receiving no answers to her distress signals, she finally sighted a light off St. David's Head, Bermuda, signalled the fort for assistance and dropped her anchor.

Paul Jones remained at Bermuda until 22 February for repairs and then sailed for Philadelphia escorted by Mars arriving on 25 February. Following permanent repairs at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Paul Jones reported to Fortress Monroe, Virginia on 18 April, and performed various duties in and around Chesapeake Bay until 6 August.

The highlight of Paul Jones ' career came on 2 July when Henderson was on fire in the Atlantic north of Bermuda and east of Virginia. Paul Jones made four trips from the burning ship to Von Steuben saving 1,250 Marines and officers together with over 50 tons of luggage, The next day she accompanied Henderson to Delaware Breakwater.

While in convoy on 7 August at sea, Paul Jones with several other ships in her group mistook O-6 for an enemy submarine and fired upon her. The submarine was struck seven times in the conning tower before the mistake was apparent. Paul Jones escorted the damaged submarine to Delaware Bay, and arrived at the breakwater the following day.

Paul Jones reported at Hampton Roads on 9 August and remained in and around Chesapeake Bay conducting mine patrols, convoy duties and other services until slated for inactivation on 31 January 1919. She decommissioned on 29 July was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 15 September and was sold on 3 January 1920 to Joseph G. Hitner, Philadelphia, who subsequently scrapped her.


USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53)

USS JOHN PAUL JONES is the third ship in the ARLEIGH BURKE - class of guided missile destroyers and was the first AEGIS destroyer to join the Pacific Fleet.

General Characteristics: Keel Laid: August 8, 1990
Launched: October 26, 1991
Commissioned: December 18, 1993
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine
Propulsion system: four General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines
Propellers: two
Blades on each Propeller: five
Length: 505,25 feet (154 meters)
Beam: 67 feet (20.4 meters)
Draft: 30,5 feet (9.3 meters)
Displacement: approx. 8.300 tons full load
Speed: 30+ knots
Aircraft: None. But LAMPS 3 electronics installed on landing deck for coordinated DDG/helicopter ASW operations.
Armament: two MK 41 VLS for Standard missiles, Tomahawk Harpoon missile launchers, one Mk 45 5-inch/54 caliber lightweight gun, two Phalanx CIWS, Mk 46 torpedoes (from two triple tube mounts)
Homeport: Pearl Harbor, Hi.
Crew: 23 Officers, 24 Chief Petty Officers and 291 Enlisted

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS JOHN PAUL JONES. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

About the Ship's Coat of Arms:

The Shield:

The dark blue and gold, in the ships shield, are the colors traditionally associated with the Navy. The anchor interlaced with the officer and enlisted swords symbolize sea prowess and teamwork. The AEGIS system's octagonal shape highlights the modern weaponry of JOHN PAUL JONES with its anti-air, surface, sub-surface and strike warfare capabilities. The white border with the thirteen black rivets represents day and night vigilance, solidity and determination. The number of rivets, resembling cannon balls, also recalls the thirteen colonies and the naval guns used by John Paul Jones in battle.

The flags, on either side of the shield, were displayed by John Paul Jones on his warships. The thirteen star flag commemorates the most famous Revolutionary War naval combat when John Paul Jones captured the Serapis. The rattlesnake "Don't Tread on Me" flag reflects the temperament of the times.

The portrait, on the crest, is of John Paul Jones, father of the American Navy. His heroism against larger and better equipped forces established a naval tradition that has never been forgotten. The naval gun represents weaponry of that period.

About the Destroyer’s Name, about Commodore John Paul Jones:

USS JOHN PAUL JONES honors the Father of the American Navy. Born in Scotland, Commodore John Paul Jones earned the undying respect and admiration of his countrymen by his extraordinary courage, tactical genius and audacity during the American War for Independence. Without hesitation, he single-handedly took the war at sea to the British, attacking their coastlines and capturing their ships in the British fleets' home waters. These acts inspired and transformed the fledgling Colonial Navy from an upstart band of rebels to a recognized fighting force, providing critical support for the colonies and their bid for independence from Great Britain. John Paul Jones is best remembered for his heroic defeat of the British 50-gun frigate Serapis on 23 September 1779. The three hour battle off Flamborough Head, in which John Paul Jones, in command of Bonhomme Richard , was victorious over a vastly superior British foe, established the spirit from which has grown the greatest navy the world has ever known.

USS JOHN PAUL JONES Image Gallery:

The photo below was taken by Thomas Heinrich and shows the JOHN PAUL JONES at Naval Base San Diego, Calif., on March 21, 2009.

The photos below were taken by me and show the JOHN PAUL JONES at Naval Base San Diego, Calif., on March 23, 2010.

The photos below were taken by me and show the JOHN PAUL JONES undergoing a 12-month Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability at BAE Ship Repair in San Diego, Calif. The photos were taken on October 3, 2012. JOHN PAUL JONES entered the shipyard on September 12.

The photo below was taken by Michael Jenning and shows the JOHN PAUL JONES at Naval Base Pearl Harbor, Hi., on October 14, 2017.

The photo below was taken by Michael Jenning and shows the JOHN PAUL JONES at Naval Base Pearl Harbor, Hi., on June 8, 2019.


USS Paul Jones (DD-10) - History

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS John Paul Jones DD 932 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: GTMO, England , Scotland , Norway , Denmark , France , Washington DC , Jamaica , Puerto Rico
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Brief Ships History
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 264 Photos on Approximately 91 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation


    Watch the video: Tidal - John Paul Jones Guitar Wars