8 November 1941

8 November 1941


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

8 November 1941

November

1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930
>December

Eastern Front

Hitler claims that Soviet loses are as high as eight to ten million



Stalin&rsquos Decrees Bare Rift with Red Officers

From The Militant, Vol. V No. 45, 8 November 1941, p. 6.
Transcribed & marked up by Einde O’Callaghan for the Encyclopaedia of Trotskyism On-Line (ETOL).

It is impossible for Stalin to hide any longer the gravity of the rift between himself and the officers&rsquo corps of the Red Army. Stalin&rsquos October 19 order &ldquofor a state of siege in Moscow&rdquo revealed to the world the growing intensity of this conflict. This order was, in effect, the first official acknowledgment of the re-shuffling of the Red High Command, which is in itself a symptom of the crisis now convulsing the Kremlin-Kui- bishev regime. But far overshadowing it in significance was another disclosure contained in this order, i.e., that Stalin is now openly relying on the GPU as his only remaining dependable prop.

The full implications of the latest re-shuffling of the High Command and the investment of the GPU with open and sweeping powers not only over the population but over the Red Army itself, soldiers and officers alike &ndash all this can be best understood in the light of Stalin&rsquos previous measures &ndash a whole series in which the &ldquoshoot-on-the-spot&rdquo ukase of October 19 is only the latest link.

On June 22, the first day of the German invasion, the European territories of the USSR were placed under martial law, with the military authorities in command.

Almost, immediately Stalin demonstrated his lack of confidence in the Red command by forming, on June 30, the State Committee for Defense (composed of Stalin, Molotov, Voroshilov, Malenkov and Berya). The then-Commissar for Defense and Commander-in- Chief of the armed forces, Marshall Timoshenko, was not included in this body. This was not an &lsquooversight,&rsquo but rather it was Stalin&rsquos step in stripping the Red command of its powers.

Next, the High Command was reshuffled on July 11. (Timoshenko assumed command of the Moscow Military District, or the Western Central Army Budenny &ndash the Kiev Military District, or the South Army and Voroshilov &ndash the Leningrad Military District, or the Northwestern Army).

Political Commissars Reintroduced

Almost unanimously [sic!] with this reshuffling of the High Command, the system of political commissars was reintroduced in the army on July 16. It is hardly necessary to dwell on the fact that this introduction of dual authority in the armed forces was a blow at the officers, stripping them of authority, and, in effect, subordinating them to the secret police arm of the regime, the GPU.

(It should be recalled that the system of political commissars was originally reintroduced by Stalin in August 1937 to facilitate the beheading of the Red Army at the time. This system was revoked &ndash undoubtedly under the pressure of the officers &ndash on August 12, 1940, after the blows of the Finnish experience.)

Each of the above-cited measures was designed not to strengthen the defensive power of the Red Army, but rather to facilitate Stalin&rsquos open assumption of the supreme command of the armed forces. They were political measures typical of Stalin&rsquos rule. On July 19, he replaced Timoshenko as People&rsquos Commissar for Defense.

On the very next day, the world learned that the Kremlin&rsquos secret police had been once again reorganized. Only a few months before, in February, the GPU had been divided into two autonomous departments, namely, the People&rsquos Commissariat of Internal Affairs and the People&rsquos Commissariat of State Security. The latter department was virtually placed under the jurisdiction of the Red command. The February &ldquoreorganization&rdquo was apparently another sop to the officers&rsquo corps, a sort of guarantee against mass purges in the army. On July 20, these two departments were &ldquounified&rdquo again under the control of Stalin&rsquos puppet, Berya.

On July 21, the system of political commissars was extended to the Red Fleet.

On the same day, more deputies were appointed for the post of Commissar of Defense. The significant thing about these new appointees is that among them were political commissars. In other words, the Commissariat of Defense was itself placed directly under the supervision of the GPU. Stalin had gathered all the threads of power into his own hands.

What These Steps Signified

The capitalist press interpreted all these moves as preventive measures designed to forestall any attempts at betrayal by the officers. It is undeniable that the Red command has many unreliable elements. They have found it easiest to advance precisely under the Kremlin regime.

But this interpretation evades the entire history of the Soviet Union under Stalin&rsquos rule. Today as in the past, Stalin&rsquos moves are dictated and motivated solely by his ruthless struggle to maintain himself in power. He realized at the very outbreak of war that the officers&rsquo corps whom he had himself raised to power a short while ago could not be depended upon to follow him blindly. The officers could not fail to become alarmed by the continued defeats of the Red Army. Besides, their own lives were at stake. Stalin&rsquos only answer was to resort openly under war-time conditions to the real bulwark of his regime &ndash the execution squads of the GPU. It is they, and not the military authorities who are now in supreme control in beleaguered Moscow, and this means &ndash everywhere, both in the front lines and in the rear.

Stalin&rsquos monstrous bureaucratic apparatus of repression began crumbling on the eve of the second World War. The war has violently speeded up this process of disintegration. The military arm of Stalin&rsquos bureaucratic apparatus has crumbled beyond repair after less than five months of war.

Stalinism Threatens Defense of USSR

We are now witnessing the final stages of the death agony of Stalinism. These final convulsions, however, carry with them also a mortal threat to the USSR, whose strength is being sapped internally by the continuation of Stalin&rsquos rule. Every day, every hour of the struggle brings additional overwhelming proof that the Soviet Union can be successfully defended only by the reconstitution of the Soviets and the return to the policies of Bolshevism which guaranteed the victory in October 1917 and beat back the imperialists and the counter-revolution in the Civil War of 1918&ndash1920.


The Fairfield Recorder (Fairfield, Tex.), Vol. 66, No. 8, Ed. 1 Thursday, November 13, 1941

Weekly newspaper from Fairfield, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.

Physical Description

eight pages : ill. page 22 x 15 in. Digitized from 35 mm. microfilm.

Creation Information

Context

This newspaper is part of the collection entitled: Freestone County Area Newspaper Collection and was provided by the Fairfield Library to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this issue can be viewed below.

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this newspaper or its content.

Editor

Publisher

Audiences

Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this newspaper as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this issue useful in their work.

Provided By

Fairfield Library

The Fairfield Library first opened its doors August 2, 1954, in a small brick house on the Courthouse square with just 224 books. By 1977, the growing library gained accreditation in the Texas Library System and subsequently became a place where families could spend time together reading and enjoying the abundant resources.


November 8, 1941 – Miriam Korber

Miriam Korber was 18 years old when she started to keep her diary. The first thing she described was the experience of deportation at the hands of the Romanian government. Romania was allied with Nazi Germany during World War II and had similar anti-Jewish policies. Miriam and her family were deported from their hometown of Campalung on October 12 and, after a torturous journey, were expelled into the region east of the Dniester River. They were essentially dumped, along with thousands of other Jews, onto the riverbank and left to fend for themselves.

No provision had been made to feed or house the refugees, so the conditions were chaotic. Miriam described the situation. “As soon as we arrived, some people were evacuated. There are camps in which people are gathered by the hundreds and from there they are driven away on foot. Therefore, we had to avoid the camps. We carried the baggage from the Dniester to a courtyard by ourselves, with much effort, and here we shivered for two hours until we found shelter. Thirty people, we stayed in one large room upstairs. With us were the Hausvaters, Horovitzes, Hellers, Segals, the Javetz, and Tartar families. Quite an interesting gathering! We carried the luggage upstairs by ourselves and, exhausted, we slept our first night in Mogilev […] The very next day after our arrival here, we started to sell off things. […] With each thing we sold, we gave away a piece of ourselves. Who knows when we will replace what we were losing now.”

The next day, the Korber family left Mogilev and arrived in Djurin, where they were able to find more permanent lodging. Conditions were harsh and the family’s resources were dwindling, but at least they began to find some stability. Djurin would be Miriam’s home for the next 2 and a half years. Although it was not surrounded by walls or fences, it was still a ghetto and Jews were forbidden to leave on threat of death. Life would be a constant struggle for Miriam and she faithfully recorded the details in her diary. Fortunately, she survived and was able return home after the war.

Miriam’s story was featured in a 2005 MTV documentary entitled, “I’m Still Here: Real Diaries of Young People Who Lived During the Holocaust.”


12,8 cm Flak 40 in Calais in November 1941

Post by Manuferey » 08 Dec 2012, 16:56

The picture below from an expired ebay action is quite interesting. It mentions a 12,8 cm Flak 40 gun in position at Calais, France, in November 1941. However, I have not found so far any other traces of these large AA guns in Calais in WW2. We only know of 8,8 cm Flak batteries around the city.

A close-up of the picture also posted on ebay confirms indeed the profile of a 12,8 cm Flak 40 (or a 10,5 cm Flak but not a 8,8 cm Flak) and reveals two buildings on the background that fit the old casino of Calais. The spelling “Kalais” with a “K” was also found on every picture on the same series posted by the seller and clearly designates “Calais”.

From what I have found so far, the static version of the 12,8 cm Flak gun did not appear in serial production until 1942. The initial version, mobile, was only manufactured in 6 pieces. Therefore, I suspect that the gun on the picture was one of the mobile ones and other 12,8 cm guns may have been installed as well to form a battery.

But what would drive the Germans to install their rarest and heaviest AA guns around Calais? One possible explanation I have is long range AA defense in the planning of Operation Cerberus: the sailing of the high value warships, Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen from Brest back to Germany through the Channel. This operation will eventually be successfully executed in February 42. The 12,8 cm Flak at Calais would have provided long range AA defense over the Channel. Higher altitude AA defense than 8,8 cm Flak guns was not interesting since attacking the warships with bombers at to be done at somewhat low altitude.

Does anybody have any information on 12,8 cm Flak 40 guns in the Calais area in late 1941- early 1942?

Re: 12,8 cm Flak 40 in Calais in November 1941

Post by jopaerya » 09 Dec 2012, 12:14

Could not find any data on the 12.8 cm Flak in Calais during the war , but your option
for temperary emplacement during the Channel Dash ( Operation Cerberus ) is a good one .

Re: 12,8 cm Flak 40 in Calais in November 1941

Post by jopaerya » 28 Dec 2012, 19:58

Found some information from the same time pad about the 12.8 cm Flak in the region Brest .
Does somebody know what a "Objektsbatterie" is ??

Re: 12,8 cm Flak 40 in Calais in November 1941

Post by JKernwerk » 28 Dec 2012, 20:02

Re: 12,8 cm Flak 40 in Calais in November 1941

Post by jopaerya » 28 Dec 2012, 20:14

Re: 12,8 cm Flak 40 in Calais in November 1941

Post by Manuferey » 29 Dec 2012, 15:16

Interesting document. Thank you, Jos !

With the mention of a battery on its way (« Anmarsch »), and the fact that the number of 12,8 cm AA guns were quite limited at the end of 1941, I wonder if it would not be the same mobile battery as the one in Calais in November . In which case, it would render obsolete my theory about the AA defense of Operation Cerberus at Calais but could still work at Brest! .

Re: 12,8 cm Flak 40 in Calais in November 1941

Post by Manuferey » 05 Jun 2016, 15:40

Manuferey wrote: The picture below from an expired ebay action is quite interesting. It mentions a 12,8 cm Flak 40 gun in position at Calais, France, in November 1941. However, I have not found so far any other traces of these large AA guns in Calais in WW2. We only know of 8,8 cm Flak batteries around the city.

A close-up of the picture also posted on ebay confirms indeed the profile of a 12,8 cm Flak 40 (or a 10,5 cm Flak but not a 8,8 cm Flak) and reveals two buildings on the background that fit the old casino of Calais. The spelling “Kalais” with a “K” was also found on every picture on the same series posted by the seller and clearly designates “Calais”.

From what I have found so far, the static version of the 12,8 cm Flak gun did not appear in serial production until 1942. The initial version, mobile, was only manufactured in 6 pieces. Therefore, I suspect that the gun on the picture was one of the mobile ones and other 12,8 cm guns may have been installed as well to form a battery.

But what would drive the Germans to install their rarest and heaviest AA guns around Calais? One possible explanation I have is long range AA defense in the planning of Operation Cerberus: the sailing of the high value warships, Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen from Brest back to Germany through the Channel. This operation will eventually be successfully executed in February 42. The 12,8 cm Flak at Calais would have provided long range AA defense over the Channel. Higher altitude AA defense than 8,8 cm Flak guns was not interesting since attacking the warships with bombers at to be done at somewhat low altitude.

Does anybody have any information on 12,8 cm Flak 40 guns in the Calais area in late 1941- early 1942?


November 19th, 1952 is a Wednesday. It is the 324th day of the year, and in the 47th week of the year (assuming each week starts on a Monday), or the 4th quarter of the year. There are 30 days in this month. 1952 is a leap year, so there are 366 days in this year. The short form for this date used in the United States is 11/19/1952, and almost everywhere else in the world it's 19/11/1952.

This site provides an online date calculator to help you find the difference in the number of days between any two calendar dates. Simply enter the start and end date to calculate the duration of any event. You can also use this tool to determine how many days have passed since your birthday, or measure the amount of time until your baby's due date. The calculations use the Gregorian calendar, which was created in 1582 and later adopted in 1752 by Britain and the eastern part of what is now the United States. For best results, use dates after 1752 or verify any data if you are doing genealogy research. Historical calendars have many variations, including the ancient Roman calendar and the Julian calendar. Leap years are used to match the calendar year with the astronomical year. If you're trying to figure out the date that occurs in X days from today, switch to the Days From Now calculator instead.


Bypaths of Kansas History - November 1941

From the Daily Missouri Republican, St. Louis, May 10, 1853.

The steamer Alton arrived from St. Joseph yesterday with a very light cargo. Her officers inform us that they were employed at that point three days in ferrying emigrants over the river. During which time they took over 7,563 head of cattle, 382 bead of horses, and 212 wagons. The emigrants had nearly all started for the Plains on Friday last when the boats left St. Joseph. The Alton made a very quick run down-fifty-two hours was her running time from St. Joseph to this city.

A VALUABLE WALNUT TREE

From the Kansas Weekly Tribune, Lawrence, August 17, 1865.

We were shown some walnut boards of the very best quality we have ever seen, three feet wide. They came from a tree which measured eighteen feet in circumference. It was sawed at Zimmerman's mill on the railroad, ten miles east, and the lumber measured full five thousand feet. This lumber is cheap at fifty dollars per thousand, and at that rate the whole products of this tree would amount to two hundred and fifty dollars. That is the value of the lumber alone. How much cord-wood and veneering the balance of the tree will make has not been estimated. We call that a valuable tree.

STYLE NOTE FROM LINN COUNTY

From the Fort Scott Monitor, November 7, 1867.

Some fifty ladies in the vicinity of Trading Post, Linn county, have adopted short skirts, which fall about to the knee. Their nether extremities are encased in pants of the same material, many of them cut very like the unmentionables of the sterner sex, while some are gathered at the ankle in genuine turkish style.

IN 1870 THIS WAS NEWS!

From the Abilene Chronicle, November 10, 1870.

How SAMSO VOTED IN ABILENE.-There was but one darkey vote cast in Abilene, at the recent election, and the foolish "cuss" voted an unscratched democratic ticket. He did it under the plea that he had "promised Massa Kuney dis mornin' dat he vote de demycrat tick sure-and dat he mus' keep de promise." We admire the darkey's pluck in keeping his promise, but he's evidently "raw," and ought to see the inside of a school house for a term or two. This case demonstrates one fact pretty clearly, namely, that if a darkey votes a democratic ticket his vote counts as much as that of a white man voting the same, or any other ticket) It's wonderful, but it's true.

414 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

REAL LONG HORNS

From the Ellsworth Reporter, December 21, 1871.

Last fall during the shipping season, three steers were found with horns of such enormous length that they could not get into a car, with a five-foot door, 'til after five inches was sawed off of each horn.

SURVEYING IN THE WILDS

From the Seneca Weekly Courier, October 11, 1872.

Armstrong's surveying party, which left Centralia last summer, have finished their work, and are coming home. They had a good time. They saw lots of wild homes, some of which were very nice. A Leavenworth man offered $1,000 for one if it could be delivered there. The Indians gathered around them near the last, and gave them five "sleeps" to get through and leave, or off would come their scalps and they showed them how it was done! But the surveyors succeeded in getting ten "sleeps," and by working late and early got done, and crossed the Arkansas river September 28. Part came home by rail, and some overland with teams.

CIRCUS TROUBLES

From the Junction City Union, August 16, 1873.

There was a big trouble at Hays the other day, caused by a locomotive trying to go into John Robinson's show without paying. The forward section of the train went too slow, and the second section too fast, the consequence was a collision, which waked up the largest and most varied collection of animals ever shown under fifteen tents, and gathered from all parts of Asia, Africa, Europe, and Billings county, to an unprecedented extent. Several cars were jammed up, and it looked at one time as if Robinson would have enough tiger steaks and monkey cutlets to last him all summer. The gorilla was heard to remark that he was mighty glad he had left off "showing," and gone to driving a team this season. Fortunately neither man nor beast was injured. The precise cause of the accident is not known. Some say one of the engineers had gazed too long at the "one-fifth of a mile" of serpents, but this is contradicted.

HOLDING COURT IN EARLY-DAY WICHITA

From the Wichita City Eagle, April 6, 1876.

The first term of the district court began on the 13th day of June. It was held in the attic of a livery stable, nearly opposite the Empire House. Hon. W. R. Brown, of the 9th district, which included Sedgwick county, was the judge. The other officers present were W. N. Walker, sheriff, F. J. Fulton, county attorney, and C. S. Roe, deputy clerk. The attorneys of the Wichita bar present, besides Fulton, were Reuben Riggs, P. T. Weeks and H. C. Slues. The attorneys from a distance present, were D. C. Hackett, Esq., of Emporia,

BYPATHS OF KANSAS HISTORY 415

and W. P. Campbell, of El Dorado. The court room was provided with one chair which was occupied by his honor the judge. The table for the accommodation of the lawyers consisted of two goods boxes set "end for end." The seats for the bar consisted of a two by six cottonwood scantling resting at each end on cracker boxes, and placed at a convenient distance from the table, and along which ranged the lawyers. Behind the boxes sat the judge in his solitary chair with big right heel resting gracefully over big left knee, his right elbow resting upon the arm of the chair, and his chin firmly planted in his right hand, and his left band in big pants pocket. The seats for the bystanders consisted of the same material and pattern as that for the bar, and ranged around the wall. The trial docket consisted of a single sheet of foolscap paper, and the bar docket and the journal of the same. The cases at issue were three: one a murder case, one a state case against . . . Alexander Jester, charged with an assault with intent to kill, and the other a divorce case. The divorce case was tried, witnesses examined and a decree for the plaintiff, which was the husband. It was developed on the trial that the defendant in her playful mood had kicked the plaintiff out of bed and compelled him to sleep on the floor, and as they lived in a dugout, this was adjudged a sufficient "ground" to justify a divorce. The case of murder was taken, by change of venue, to Butler county. In the assault case the defendant interposed a motion to "squash" the information, which was done. It is a curious fact that no record of the proceedings of that court was made, and not even the scratch of a pen remains to tell the fact of the granting of that divorce.

YOO, HOO!

From the Garden City Paper, May 1, 1879.

The boys must be getting hard up for seeing girls when they will go two miles to an emigrant camp to see one, as some of the boys did here last Sunday.

PLAYING INDIAN

From the Dodge City Times, November 29, 1879.

The "Indian racket," once a favorite sport in Dodge City, was indulged in on Monday last. A party of three citizens leisurely took a ride over the hills in search of antelope, as it was stated to the young man who was to be made the victim of the joke. The antelope hunting party discussed the probability of Indian wars and redskins generally, and all at once ran across five persons dressed in Indian costumes and war paint, who gave the antelope hunters a chase for about two miles, until within a half a mile of town, the deception being uncovered by a proceeding most "fowl." A number of citizens had gathered on boot hill to witness the Indians drive in the antelope hunters, but the latter discovered the deception before they reached the city limits. This game has been played successfully many times before. The practice had been to give the "Indian racket" to a conceited or cheeky person, and subjecting him to this scare would take the "starch out of him." In his humiliation and feelings of disgrace the victim of the joke would take the first train out of Dodge. But the old practices in Dodge are fast fading away.

416 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

From the Phillips County Herald, Phillipsburg, March 11, 1880.

Geo. W. Stinson was suddenly shut down on last week. He was arguing a point of law with much earnestness before Esq. McCormick when Mr. Lowe, the county clerk, rushed in in great haste, exclaiming: "Mack, your office is on fire." Stinson finished his sentence as be followed the court out at the door. Six years ago he says he was suddenly interrupted in his argument by a herd of buffalo rushing into town.

From the Logan Enterprise, June 17, 1880.

On Monday a jack rabbit hailing from Iowa and going west to escape the drought, passed up Main street with all the dogs in town after him. He happened to pass by the place where city election was being held and in less than three shakes of a dead lamb's tail the judges and clerks of election and candidates for mayor had joined in the chase. It is needless to add that the jack made a better run than some of the candidates.

From the Seneca Weekly Courier, September 17, 1880.

A gentleman from out west named Gregory . . . tells some queer works by the negro colony in Graham county. There are 800 in the colony, and all are doing well. One negro has a cow with which he broke and improved twelve acres of prairie and cultivated eight acres of corn his wife drives the cow and keeps the flies off. Another one spaded a four-foot hedge row around 160 acme of land.

From the Norton County People, Norton, September 23, 1880.

Peter Smoker, who resides one mile east of the Catholic church, near Almelo, has the right kind of grit for this country. His wheat being so short that it could not be cradled, he harvested three acres by cutting it with a butcher knife.

From The Buckner Independent, Jetmore, February 18, 1881.

One of Lillard Sanders' bones was drifted up against the roof of his stable, inside, on Monday last. The snow drifted in behind the animal and was packed down under its feet as fast as it came in, until the animal was jammed up against the roof. Lillard procured a shovel and worked faithfully until he rescued the horse.

BYPATHS OF KANSAS HISTORY 417

IT MUST HAVE BEEN BOOGIE-WOOGIE

From The Globe Live Stock Journal, Dodge City, February 23, 1886.

The buffalo that runs about town is accustomed to the music of the Cowboy band it's Western in appearance and does not interfere with the peace and happiness of the buffalo, but there are some things that the buffalo won't stand, and among them is a strange lot of men blowing horns marching through the streets, headed by a drum major dressed in red trimmings and a woolly hat. Yesterday the buffalo observed the Simon Comedy Company's Hussar band parading the streets and took exceptions, and with bead down and tail up charged that band. The music ceased with the first bellow of that wild animal, and the band done some excellent running. It was the worst broke up parade you ever saw. The buffalo took possession of the street, while the band roosted on fences, porches and small shanties.

SODA FOUNTAINS AND PEANUTS FIRST

From the Ford County Republican, Dodge City, June 8, 1887.

The city council have shut off the soda fountains and peanut stands on Sunday, but the whisky joints go unmolested. There is a belief that this action was taken to relieve the police from watching the soda stands so they could give their exclusive attention to the joints. We can now look for some decisive action. The joints must go.

PIONEERING IN MORTON COUNTY

From the Harper Sentinel, November 28, 1889.

I am writing in my far western home, the one I love best. Let me describe it to you. It is what we call in Morton county a dug-out, Ours is dug four feet down, and has a frame part about five feet high on top of the ground. It is 12 x 20 inside, with a white-washed ceiling and a canvas partition. The door, a "shoot" as we call it out west, is in the east end. There is a whole window in the north side, a half window in the west, and a whole window and two half windows in the south. The last three are filled with house plants-they do splendidly in a dug-out. I have a canary bird to sing to me a pet skunk, a dog and a cat. I was raised in the city never saw a cow milked until I was past sixteen. It is hard work to come west to make a home. Few have the vim and back-bone to stay long enough to prove up their land under the homestead law. I don't want to brag, but we are going to try to be among the few. I'll tell you how we manage: There are four of us. My husband and two little boys (most too small to be of much use, but a great comfort) and myself comprise our family. This year everything was a failure in this county. Everybody left that could, but we have a few

18 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

cattle and enough corn stalks to keep them alive till grass comes. I said "we must stick to the land, old boy, just as long as we can raise the roughness to winter on." Some mornings there would be fourteen wagons going east, but they are not all gone, for we are here yet. Last spring everything was fine good prospects for plenty in the fall but the hot winds came and the rain did not. Out of the eighty acres of spring crops we planted we got nothing but corn stalks, not an ear of corn or a kernel for the seed. We may be thankful for the stalks, as some did not even get stalks. We are 47 miles from the railroad and the only way to get a living is to freight. It takes four days to go to the railroad and back with a load. My man has gone for a load now. While he is gone I take care of thirteen head of cattle, two pigs, one colt, and milk four cows, do my house work, make lace and crazy patch. This morning I sawed a new stove-pipe hole through the roof and put up a tin to run the pipe out through. The boys are at school. I sleep with a double-barreled shot-gun loaded in the closet and a revolver handy. I hear some one say, "Of course, she's afraid of those horrid cowboys." No, that is not what I'm afraid of the cowboy is a gentleman if you treat him as such you will never have a better friend. It is the out-law that people fear "out west." The outlaw will dress much like the cowboy, and an inexperienced person will take him for one, but there is a vast difference. We are near the "Strip," or "No Man's Land," as it is called here. This "No Man's Land" is a place without government. Everyone does as he pleases, so of course it is the abode of criminals, who break out once in a while and make a raid through the country. Stealing mules was their last meanness. In this country a man's team is his living, and anyone stealing it takes the bread and butter out of his little children's mouths, making them as well as their parents suffer. We have a good span of mules and sometime I'm afraid they will come to steal them. If they should not find the mules they might try to carry us off. In that case, they would strike a Tartar, someone would get hurt. My nearest neighbor is one mile northeast. Our nearest town is Richfield. The people east are sending aid to Morton county, and it needs it bad. There are a great many people here that can't get away, and can't make a living here, for there is nothing to do. Fortunately we have not had to be helped yet, but I don't know how long we can keep up. It is hard work, hard work, I tell you, and little pay. We have already had a bitter touch of winter. It began by raining, and rained two weeks steady. Then the snow came and the wind with it, and for four days and nights kept snowing and blowing. We were literally snowed under. Through it all the stock bad to be looked after and run under shelter. When they get out in a storm they drift with the wind, and get lost, often killed. Times are hard, but I am generous and when you come "out west" just stay awhile at our dug-out.

You shall have pancakes and meat grease for breakfast-maybe a little coffee. Light bread for dinner, and mush and milk for supper the year round, with occasionally a young jack-rabbit fried with some milk gravy. . . . P. E. T.

Kansas History: A Journal of the Central Plains

The latest in scholarship on Kansas history, published quarterly since 1978 by the Kansas Historical Foundation.


8 November 1941 - History

On 27 November 1941, World Cup-winning French manager Aimé Jacquet was born in the commune of Sail-sous-Couzan.

He enjoyed a long a successful playing career as a defensive midfielder, spending thirteen seasons at Saint-Étienne from 1960 to 1973. While there, he won five league titles and lifted the Coupe de France three times (and in 1968, he made his only two appearances for France). He moved to Lyon for his last two seasons before retiring in 1976, then took charge of the club as manager that year.

After four seasons in charge of Lyon, he switched to Bordeaux and guided the Girondins to the league title in 1984 and 1985, the Coupe de France in 1986, and a league and cup double in 1987. Despite that success, he fell out with the club president and left in 1989. Brief spells with Montpellier (1989-90) and Nancy (1990-91) followed before he took the reins of the national team in 1993.

When he took over, France had just failed to qualify for the 1994 World Cup and shortly afterward suffered the loss of captain Eric Cantona to a year-long suspension. But he rebuilt the team around midfielder Zinedine Zidane and led them to the quarterfinals of Euro '96.

He adopted a 4-2-1-3 formation and frequently experimented with his line-up, which drew heavy criticism from French commentators. But his work led France to victory in the 1998 World Cup with a 3-0 victory over Brazil in the Stade de France.

Jacquet stepped down as manager immediately after the tournament, but served as technical director for the national team until his retirement 2006.


This Day in Susanville History – November 8th, 1941

Under the direction of state and federal government inspectors work is being rushed on a 100-acre foot reservoir on the premises of Mardis Barry, whose holdings are located a mile and half east of Susanville.

The big individual irrigating system, the first of the kind constructed in this section of the state, is being financed by the Farm Security Administration.

Already 10,000 cubic yards of earth have been moved in construction of two main earthen dams.

Howard Hunde of Ukiah, California, of the Bureau of Soil Conservation of the State Department of Agriculture, is making tests to determine the solidity of the pack.

Thomas F. McGowan of Placerville, government construction engineer, is in charge of the work. Barry, brother of Attorney Hardin Barry of Susanville, will water 60 acres of alfalfa with his storage of mountain runoff water.

Another 100 acres under cultivation on his premises is irrigated by waters of the Susan River.

Don’t know how to scan your photos?

Our friends at the UPS Store have offered to professionally scan your vintage photo submissions for free. Just stop by 2850 Main Street in Susanville and they will be happy to help you.


Wheels West Day in Susanville History – November 8th, 1941

Under the direction of state and federal government inspectors work is being rushed on a 100-acre foot reservoir on the premises of Mardis Barry, whose holdings are located a mile and half east of Susanville.

The big individual irrigating system, the first of the kind constructed in this section of the state, is being financed by the Farm Security Administration.

Already 10,000 cubic yards of earth have been moved in construction of two main earthen dams.

Howard Hunde of Ukiah, California, of the Bureau of Soil Conservation of the State Department of Agriculture, is making tests to determine the solidity of the pack.

Thomas F. McGowan of Placerville, government construction engineer, is in charge of the work. Barry, brother of Attorney Hardin Barry of Susanville, will water 60 acres of alfalfa with his storage of mountain runoff water.

Another 100 acres under cultivation on his premises is irrigated by waters of the Susan River.