Gilliam APA-57 - History

Gilliam APA-57 - History


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Gilliam

A county in the State of Oregon.

(APA-57: dp. 4,247, 1. 426' b. 58', dr. 16', s. 16.9 k, cpl.
283; a. 1 5'; cl. Gilliam)

Gilliam (APA-57) was launched 28 March 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by the Consolidated Steel Corp., Wilmington, Calif.; sponsored by Mrs. A. O. Williams of Wilmington; acquired 31 July 1944, and commissioned 1 August 1944, Comdr. H. B. Olsen in command.

The first of a new type of attack transport, Gilliam stood out of San Francisco Bay 16 October 1944 with 750 Army troops for Oro Bay, New Guinea and delivered them to that port 4 November. Embarking nearly 1000 troops of the 11th Airborne Division, she sailed a week later and off-loaded her passengers at Leyte, subsequently returning to Humboldt Bay, New Guinea, 22 November. Gilliam got underway again 29 November under orders to steam to Leyte Gulf and embark elements of the 6th Army Headquarters for passage to Lingayen Gulf.

Gilliam was part of a 36 ship convoy churning toward the Philippines when 5 December 1944 the convoy came under heavy air attack while 100 miles from Leyte Gulf. At 1218 Gilliam spotted a plane coming in low on the water at deck level, headed for the middle of the convoy. Coming under limited fire, the Japanese plane released a torpedo 2 minutes later which smashed into SS Anton Saugraine. Just after 1230 two more planes came in low and fast, and one got another torpedo into the stricken merchantman, which was then dead in the water. Intense fire from the convoy drove the planes off, but later that afternoon another Japanese aircraft dove in at 1530, and after running into heavy fire, made a suicide crash on SS Marous Daly. The Japanese caught her on the bow at waterline and started fires and explosions. A second kamikaze tried his luck but missed and crashed into the sea after repeated hits from the convoy's gunners. Anton Saugraine and Marcus Daly were kept afloat by quick damage control, but the former ship was attacked again the next day while under tow and was finally sunk. During this engagement, Gilliam's unflinching crew stood at General Quarters for nearly 12 hours and the ship reached Leyte 6 December without damage.

At Leyte Gilliam acted as receiving ship for the crews of damaged warships and undertook medical and salvage operations in spite of continued air alerts. After embarking over 500 soldiers at Tacloban, she sailed from that port 7 January 1945 bringing troops to Lingayen Gulf in support of the invasion. She returned to Leyte on 14 January to embark elements of the 32d Infantry Division and brought them safely back to Lingayen Gulf 27 January. After loading casualties for passage to Leyte, Gilliam sailed from that port 2 February to embark Marines of the 3d Amphibious Corps at Guadalcanal and conducted training exercises in preparation for the coming invasion of Okinawa.

Gilliam closed Okinawa on 1 April and in the face of kamikaze attacks debarked reconnaissance parties of the 3d Amphibious Corps and unloaded vital cargo. On 5 April she sailed for the United States via Saipan and Pearl Harbor, mooring at San Francisco 27 April for drydock repairs.

Subsequently Gilliam embarked men of the 6th Seabee Battalion a Port Hueneme, Calif., and sailed 28 May 1g45 for Okinawa via Eniwetok and Ulithi. She o~ loaded cargo and passengers at Okinawa and returned to San Francisco 10 August, where nearly 1,000 troops were embarked and brought to Pearl Harbor on 27 August. Men of the Headquarters and Service Battalions, 5th Amphibious Corps came on board at Hawaii, and Gilliam sailed 1 September for Sasebo, Japan, and put her occupation troops ashore 3 weeks later.

On 25 September 1945 she got underway for Manila, and after embarking more than 450 veterans of the 32d Infantry Division at Lingayen Gulf, she carried them to Sasebo, arriving 15 October. After returning to Cebu in the Philippines 29 October, she became part of the "MagicCarpet" fleet and sailed 2 November with 1,000 bluejackets and soldiers, debarking them at Portland, Oreg., 21 November 1945.

Following a voyage to Samar, Gilliam moored at Pearl Harbor 16 February 1946 and prepared to participate in the atomic bomb tests at Bikini atoll in the summer of 1946. On the morning of 1 July 1946, Gilliam, a target ship for Test Able, was sunk in Bikini lagoon.

Gilliam received two battle stars for World War II service.


Gilliams of Virginia

GILLIAMs of VIRGINIA
Updated May 25, 2020


One cannot ignore Virginia when engaging in GILLIAM research. As on can see form the 1840 Census, most Gilliams lived in Virginia and those states that bordered Virginia.



Information on this website is arranged by County and then within in each County by type of source document&mdash Chancery Causes, Deeds, Wills , etc. These sources are listed alphabetically.

Each page begins with County Formation and Background and information on the early Parishes of that particular County.

Genealogical information is summarized in a County Overview .

Occasionally, following a particular record, explanatory information will be included. Such "editorial" comments are set off in brackets [. ].

Information on names similar to GILLIAM are, at times, included for clarity's sake. For example, the Gilmans of Hanover County may be found on the Hanover County Page.

  • What's New you will find a list of new pages
  • Search , where you will be able to search the entire site.
  • Foundations you will find information about the spelling and pronunciation of the name as well as the coat of arms.
  • County Formation speaks to the importance of looking at the history of a counties geography as County lines often change and as Counties have often split during Virginia's history.
  • Fact or Fiction addresses some of the most common Gilliam genealogical errors
  • Allied Families you will find information on families that married into the Gilliams of Virginia and/or used the surname Gilliam as a given name.
  • Given Names traces a given name through Virginia records
  • The Topical Pages compiles statewide information by topic such as all the Gilliam land patents and grants
  • City/State/Country Pages documenting Virginian Gilliams that have removed to other states

The following icon indicates that I have on file a copy of the original document.

(See Halifax County, Will of Richard Gilliam, Inventory of Richard Gilliam, Account of Sale of Estate of Richard Gilliam)




Visitors



Copyright, Fair Use, etc.
I along with the help of several fellow GILLIAM researchers, in particular Mary Ellen Baker, Bonnie Flythe and Helen Sills have devoted many hours to compiling the information found on this site. Copyright of the information found at GILLIAMs of Virginia is held by Gregory A. GILLIAM, except as noted in sources.
None of the information found at GILLIAMs of Virginia may be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including, but not limited to, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Gregory A. GILLIAM.

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Permission is granted to download and print information found at GILLIAMs of Virginia for personal, non-commercial use only. This permission terminates automatically if you breach any of these terms or conditions.
By using the information found at GILLIAMs of Virginia you acknowledge that you have read, understood, and agree to be bound by the above.
Gregory A. GILLIAM may at any time revise these terms.


1944: UFO & Alien Sightings

Date: 1944
Location: Royaume, England
Time:
Summary: UFO sightings photos in the history of UK.
Source:

Date: 1944
Location: Germany
Time:
Summary: World War II pilots on both sides of the conflict reported, “Foo fighters,” bright, unidentified flying objects that move in the sky in a strange manner.
Source:

Date: 1944
Location: Austria, Klagenfurt
Time:
Summary: Major Leet, a bomber pilot, saw a luminous disc follow his plane and its maneuvers.
Source:

Date: Jan. 2/3, 1944
Location: Halberstadt, Germany
Time:
Summary: Two rockets altered course fiery head and blazing stern.
Source: Page 54 Ref.1

Date: Jan. 5, 1943
Location: Kiel, Germany
Time:
Summary: Black plate-sized discs.
Source: Page 55 Ref.1

Date: Jan. 28, 1944
Location: Somewhere over France
Time:
Summary: Airborne red light.
Source: Page 56 Ref.1

Date: Jan. 29, 1944
Location: Location unknown
Time:
Summary: Red ball yellow/red flames followed aircraft through evasive action.
Source : Page 56 Ref.1

Date: Feb. 1944
Location: Bass Strait, Australia
Time: 2:30 a.m.
Summary: At 2:30 a.m. A bomber crew at 4,500 feet altitude saw a dark shape pull alongside the plane and pace it at a distance of about 100 feet for about 18-20 minutes. A flickering light was visible at its trailing end, which illuminated the rear portion of the object. While the object was alongside all radio and direction-finding instruments on the plane malfunctioned. Finally the object accelerated and sped away.
Source: Ref. 3 Bill Chalker, The Oz Files, 1996, pp. 35-36

Date: Feb. 4, 1944
Location: Frankfurt, Germany
Time:
Summary: Two sightings: stationary object of tear-drop shape, resembling a balloon shiny silver ball looking like a very bright weather balloon with a metal sheen.
Source: Page 59 Ref.1

Date: Feb. 4, 1944
Location: Dutch coast
Time:
Summary: One long black stationary object, similar to a small flak burst floating.
Source: Page 59 Ref.1

Date: Feb. 8, 1944
Location: Frankfurt, Germany
Time:
Summary: Silver-colored ball-like object changing stationary.
Source: Page 59 Ref.1

Date: Feb. 19/20, 1944
Location: Leipzig-Berlin area, Germany
Time:
Summary: Two objects: glowing balls snake-like motion.
Source: Page 59-60 Ref.1

Date: Feb. 19/20, 1944
Location: Coblence and Aachen, Germany
Time:
Summary: Silvery cigar-shaped object like an airship appeared to be a line of windows along the bottom of the object.
Source: Page 60 Ref.1

Date: February 22, 1944
Location: Washington, DC
Time:
Summary: On February 22, Franklin D. Roosevelt writes a Top Secret memo on White House stationary for “The special committee on non-terrestrial science and technology.” Both the title and the content clearly allude to extraterrestrial life, the former using the word “non-terrestrial” and the latter talks about “coming to grips with the reality that our planet is not the only one harboring intelligent life the universe.
Source:

Date: Feb. 24/25, 1944
Location: St. Quentin, France
Time:
Summary: Three silver objects & resembling zeppelins & moving independently of the wind & not interconnected.
Source: Page 60 Ref.1

Date: March, 1944
Location: Carlsbad, NM
Time:
Summary: Air Force pilot saw fast-moving UFO speed out of sight over horizon.
Source: NICAP UFO Evidence, 1964, Hall, III

Date: April 11, 1944
Location: Location unknown, probably Germany
Time:
Summary: Projectiles resembling glider bombs a large orange glow & smoke trail.
Source: Page 66 Ref.1

Date: April 25, 1944
Location: France
Time:
Summary: Black tear-dropped craft.
Source: Page 63 Ref.1

Date: April 26, 1944
Location: Essen, Germany
Time:
Summary: Things four orange glows short stubby wings football-sized­ looking like large oranges.
Source: Page 64-65 Ref.1

Date: Summer 1944
Location: Normandy, France
Time:
Summary: Los Angeles columnist George Todt, in a party of four Army officers including a Lt. Col., watched a pulsating red fireball sail up to the front lines, hover for 15 minutes, then move away.
Source: NICAP UFO Evidence, 1964, Hall, IV

Date: Summer 1944
Location: Italy
Time:
Summary: Egg-shaped, metallically glistening motionless object
Source:

Date: June 1944
Location: Normandy, France
Time:
Summary: Luminescent discus-shaped object.
Source: Page 67-68 Ref.1

Date: June 1944
Location: Palmyra Atoll
Time: About midnight.
Summary: Anchored at Palmyra Atoll, Edward W. Ludwick, Executive Officer on a Coast Guard crewed cargo vessel was witness to an unusual object. After searching for a lost Navy aircraft, a moving star-like light which began to swell like a balloon as it came closer. Viewed with binoculars: it was a round sphere hovering 5X brighter than stars, it moved slowly for half an hour covering 90 degs, then headed northward
Source: Clark & Farish, Foo-Fighters of WWII

Date: June 1944
Location: Adriatic Sea
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Summary: At 11:00 a.m. a flight of three P-38 fighters at 33,000 feet saw above them, at an estimated altitude of 50,000 feet, a silver disc. The object descended to about 40,000 feet and paced the fighters for 3 minutes, then accelerated and sped away.
Source: Ref. 3 Jan Aldrich, Project ACUFOE, from CUFOS report form

Date: June 1 1944
Location: Penuela Puerto Rico
Time: 19:00
Summary: . This happened when I was 8-years old in Penuela, Puerto Rico. Around 7:00 pm I was outside playing alone. I heard a sound of bees buzzing overhead as though a very large and angry swarm were about to attack. I took cover on the ground and when I looked up and to the side from my prone position on the ground I saw a hovering circular and very large round aircraft with many lights shining from underneath the craft. It took off after a few seconds. My name is ((name deleted)). I live at ((address deleted)) Drive, Lake Worth, FL 33467.
Source: National UFO Reporting Center

Date: June 6, 1944
Location: France
Time: 01:00
Summary: I was part of the 8th Air force during world war two. We where on a bombing mission in the early hours of the Normandy landings our target was a railroad depot where the Germans used that railroad to bring men and material up to the Atlantic wall so being that reinforcements could be brought up and to cut supply lines it was a target. After all these years I’ve lost the coordinates of our target. About 10 minutes after we crossed the coast. I heard one of our escorts over the radio call out “bandits 6″o’clock high and low.” Now, after I heard this, I went to cock my weapon I was the right side waist gunner looking inside of our formation before we left on our raid i and check and recheck my weapon. One of the objects appeared in between our formation and my I went to cock my weapon and it jammed i tried my best to check the jam. It appeared normal. About fifteen minutes after it appeared, it disappeared and my weapon had cleared. It was the strangest thing ever because we also had radio loss and our number four engine had stalled out. I am writing this on behalf of a vet who i heard this story from.
Source: National UFO Reporting Center

Date: June 6, 1944
Location: Normandy Coast, France
Time:
Summary: Dark ellipsoidal object & blunted on each end like sausage.
Source: Page 67 Ref.1

Date: June 6, 1944
Location: just off Omaha Beach, France
Time:
Summary: Edward Breckel, gunner on the USS George E. Badger, reported that a dark ellipsoidal object was seen five miles away about 15 ft above water moving in a circular course for 3 minutes.
Source: Chester, page 67, CIRFO Orbit, Jan 1955

Date: June 22, 1944
Location: Oahu, Near Kaneohe, Hawaii
Time:
Summary: An object was observed. Metallic traces found. One object was observed by one experienced male witness on the shore. Seven 4.5-foot-tall dwarfs, each wearing a green coverall, were seen. / An object was allegedly shot down by the U.S. military as it attempted to depart from the island of Oahu, Hawaii near Kaneohe. One female occupant was captured and flown to Washington, DC .
Source: Webb, David HUMCAT: Catalogue of Humanoid Reports

Date: June/July 1944
Location: Normandy, France
Time:
Summary: Spheres approximately the size of a football.
Source: Page 70 Ref.1

Date: July 1944
Location: Turk Island
Time:
Summary: An unidentified was tracked by radar only by 11 witnesses. (Martin) Sources are Condon Files, NICAP files Not much of a citation, but this is all we have. Radar only doesn’t mean much as the Navy and AAF were running into false returns around the Pacific. However, these are interesting as there were indications that the Navy did a special study during the war and indications are that other study(ies) during the Korean War were conducted.
Source: Jan Aldrich,UFO DNA – PB4Y1

Date: July 1944
Location: Brest, France
Time:
Summary: Two men of the 175th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division, saw a large rectangular object with no apparent source of propulsion move steadily over the front lines and out to sea. The UFO at one point passed in front of the moon, briefly obscuring it from view.
Source: NICAP UFO Evidence, 1964, Hall, IV

Date: July 1944
Location: Normandy, France
Time:
Summary: Targets flying at extremely high altitudes
Source: Page 81 Ref.1

Date: Aug. 1, 1944
Location: Ploesti, Rumania
Time:
Summary: Yellow object traveling several times the speed of an aircraft.
Source: Page 71 Ref.1

Location: Sumatra
Time:
Summary: Sighting of maneuvering UFO which paced B-29 (Reida case) during mission.
Source: NICAP UFO Evidence, 1964, Hall, III

Date: August 10, 1944
Location: Kharagpur, India
Time:
Summary: On August 10, 1944, Captain Alvah M. Reida was piloting a B-29 bomber based at Kharagpur India, on a mission over Palembang, Sumatra, when his right gunner and co-pilot noticed a sphere ‘probably five or six feet in diameter, of a very bright and intense red or orange in color’ that constantly throbbed, about 12,500 ft off the starboard wing. It kept up with the B-29, then flying at 210 mph. Reida tried to shake it off his plane, but it stayed in the same relative position until , after eight minutes, it ‘made an abrupt 90 degree turn and accelerated rapidly, disappearing in the overcast
Source:

Date: Aug. 10/11, 1944
Location: Palembang, Sumatra
Time:
Summary: Reddish orange balls, about the size of a baseball spherical object, probably 5 or 6 feet in diameter, of a very bright and intense red or orange in color.
Source: Page 71-74 Ref.1

D ate: Aug. 12, 1944
Location: Pelice, Southern France
Time:
Summary: Enormous disc circular lights (changing from bright yellow top white) like portholes in a ship motionless.
Source: Page 75 Ref.1

Date: Aug. 13, 1944
Location: Kaoe Bay, Indonesia
Time:
Summary: Very brilliant light appearing to hover in air for at least five minutes
Source:

Date: Aug. 1944
Location: Bt. St. Lo and Vire, France
Time:
Summary: Cherry-red light size of large star sat motionless in sky before disappearing into clouds.
Source:

Date: End Aug., 1944
Location: Mattoon, IL
Time:
Summary: A mysterious man appeared at windows, as if in search of someone. He stunned witnesses by pointing at them a device that “made consciousness dissolve” and left a strange cloying smell behind
Source: Magonia #51, FSR 61, 3

Date: Sept. 1944
Location: Antwerp, Belgium
Time: 9 p.m.
Summary: Around 9 p.m. in the evening a Canadian soldier, stationed near the front lines close to Antwerp, observed “a glowing globe” traveling from the direction of the front line towards Antwerp. It seemed to be about a meter in diameter and looked as though it was of cloudy glass with a light inside. It gave off a soft white glow. Its altitude seemed to be about 13 metres, speed about 50 Km/h, and there was no sound of any sort. It was obviously powered and controlled. It was followed by another which in turn was followed by others, five in all.”
Source: Don Berliner files

Date: Sept. 1944
Location: Oak Ridge, TN
Time:
Summary: “Back on the American home front, on the banks of the Clinch River at Oak Ridge, TN, a huge, black, windowless building was being constructed. In the middle of Sept 1944, this structure, a gaseous diffusion plant, began operation. This unusual factory was designed to prepare quantities of fissionable material for the US’ most important secret weapon, the A-bomb. “Shortly after the plant began operations, the area had a very odd visitor. A strange, metallic looking, tube-like object was spotted hovering over the road near the Oak Ridge plant. The object moved away as a crowd started to gather. The sighting was reported to the FBI (20).”
Source: Charles Fort. Reference (20) is from Lorenzen, UFOs: The Whole Story.

Date: Sept. 1944
Location: Unknown Japanese island
Time:
Summary: White object & egg-shaped & very brilliant.
Source:

Date: Sept. 1944
Location: England
Time:
Summary: Bright spherical object & like a rolling ball
Source:

Date: Late Sept. 1944
Location: Dover, England
Time:
Summary: Solid black cylindrical-shaped red glow emitting from rear
Source: Page 81-82 Ref.1

Date: Fall 1944
Location: Holland
Time:
Summary: Light moving high in night sky.
Source:

Date: Oct. 1944
Location: Southeast Holland
Time:
Summary: Field Artillery officer and men saw a brilliant object moving from NW to SW, crossing an arc of about 90 degrees in about 45 minutes.
Source: NICAP UFO Evidence, 1964, Hall, IV

Date: Oct. 10, 1944
Location: Alghut, Sweden
Time: 8:00 p.m
Summary: At 8:00 p.m. a man on a bicycle was suddenly illuminated by a light beam from the woods, then he saw a large shining sphere rise rapidly from the ground and hover at treetop height. It appeared moon-like golden in color, and made no sound. After about 5 minutes the object abruptly disappeared.
Source: Anders Liljegren AFU archives

Date: Oct. 16, 1944
Location: Formosa, Taiwan
Time:
Summary: Small black dot hanging stationary.
Source:

Date: Oct. 20, 1944
Location: Po Valley, Italy
Time:
Summary: Red light appearance of an aircraft light.
Source:

Date: Oct. 20, 1944
Location: Florence, Italy
Time:
Summary: Two orange balls diving into the hills.
Source:

Date: Oct. 25, 1944
Location: Omura, Japan
Time:
Summary: Multiple sightings of possible balloons.
Source:

Date: Oct. 29, 1944
Location: Munich, Germany
Time:
Summary: Light blue colored ball of fire approximately three feet in diameter.
Source:

Date: Oct. 30/31, 1944
Location: Cologne, Germany
Time:
Summary: A ball of fire circular, pale orange, clean edged light.
Source:

Date: Nov. 1944
Location: France
Time:
Summary: 415th Night Fighter Squadron pilot saw formation of round objects.
Source: NICAP UFO Evidence, 1964, Hall, III

Date: Nov. 5, 1944
Location: Singapore, Malaya
Time:
Summary: A long purple-blue parabolic trail.
Source:

Date: Nov. 5/6, 1944
Location: Aachen/Bonn, Aachen/Cologne, Germany
Time:
Summary: Possible jet single light 5 free lance visuals on jets, no A.I. or G.C.I. contacts several flares similar to jets.
Source:

Date: Nov. 16, 1944
Location: Enroute Leyte, Philippine Island
Time:
Summary: 2355 or 11:55 pm local. USS Gilliam, enroute Leyte, Philippine Island, from Oro Bay, New Guinea. Ship’s log reports that Lt. J.L. Besmond, OOD, on USS Gilliam, APA 57, in company Task Unit 79.15.1. Combat reports unidentified object, distance 21 miles
Source: USS Gilliam Ship’s Log See Nov. 1944 entry above

Date: Nov. 22, 1944
Location: Germany
Time:
Summary: Spherical object, fluctuating in brightness, pyrotechnic pink in color, changing speeds violently, swift and jerking movements.
Source:

Date: Nov. 24, 1944
Location: Northern Italy
Time:
Summary: Round amber light, luminous orange-yellow, blinding light felt unbearable heat.
Source:

Date: Nov. 26, 1944
Location: Mannheim, Germany
Time:
Summary: Red light that disappeared in long red streak.
Source:

Date: Late November (possibly 28-30), 1944
Location: Strasbourg, Germany
Time:
Summary: Eight to ten lights in a row, glowing orange, and moving at terrific speed.
Source:

Date: Late November, 1944
Location: Lingayen Gulf, Philippines
Time:
Summary: Bright green globe.
Source:

Date: Dec. 1944
Location: Austria
Time:
Summary: B-17 pilot (William D. Leet) and crew, on a lone wolf mission, were followed by an amber-colored disc.
Source: NICAP UFO Evidence, 1964, Hall, III

Date: Dec. 1944
Location: Bt. Strasbourg and Manheim, Germany
Time:
Summary: Bright fuzzy round ball, twice the size of full moon yellow, white, red tint that was not solid color no radar return.
Source: Page 118-119 Ref.1

Date: Dec. 1944
Location: Bt. Frankfurt and Karlsrhue, Germany
Time:
Summary: Three to four very bright balls, completely illuminated red, yellow, white and blue in color size of tennis ball at arms length.
Source: Page 119 Ref.1

Date: Dec. 1944
Location: Somewhere bt. eastern France and Western Germany
Time:
Summary: String of lights, twelve to fifteen in number, orange to yellow in color, approximately four feet in diameter, stretching twice the length of crews aircraft no radar contact

Date: Dec. 2, 1944
Location: Villafranca, Ghedi Airdrome area, Italy
Time:
Summary: A steady, seemingly hanging light.
Source:

Date: Dec. 5, 1944
Location: Rhine River area, Germany
Time:
Summary: Alleged aircraft that climbed out of range in nothing flat.
Source:

Date: Dec. 14/15, 1944
Location: Erstein, Germany
Time:
Summary: Brilliant red light & appeared to be 4 or 5 times larger than a star going 200 mph.
Source: P age 96,130 Ref.1

Date: Mid Dec. 1944 (within first two weeks of Ardennes offensive)
Location: Germany
Time:
Summary: Amorphous reddish-glow that at times appeared cigar-shaped.
Source:

Date: Dec. 17, 1944
Location: Breisach, Germany
Time:
Summary: 5 or 6 flashing red and green lights in T-shape.
Source:

Date: December 22, 1944
Location: Hagenau, Germany
Time: 6:00 am
Summary: On , Lt. David McFalls of the US 415 th night fighter squadron was over Hagenau, Germany. At 6:00 am, he saw two ‘hug, bright orange lights’ climbing toward the plane. McFalls dived, banked and turned his plane, but the UFOs stuck with him for two minutes, then peeled off and blinked out.
Source:

Date: Dec. 23/24, 1944
Location: Germany
Time:
Summary: Red streak in sky.
Source:

Date: Dec. 23/24, 1944
Location: Germany (no positive location)
Time:
Summary: Glowing red object shooting straight up appeared to be aircraft doing a wingover and going into a dive and disappearing.
Source:

Date: Sometime between. Dec. 16 and 24, 1944
Location: Germany
Time:
Summary: Amorphous reddish-glow that at times appeared cigar-shaped.
Source:

Date: Dec. 26/27, 1944
Location: Germany
Time:
Summary: Multiple sightings: red balls of fire two yellow streaks of flame & disappeared from view the crew thought they felt prop wash a group of lights that made distinct lines, somewhat like arrows row of vertical white lights.
Source:

Date: Dec. 26/27, 1944
Location: Worms, Germany
Time:
Summary: Circular, fiery ball triangle of ovals three circular, reddish-blue in color, vivid lights, looking like flames, in a tight inverted triangle formation.
Source:

Date: Dec. 27, 1944
Location: Luneville, France
Time:
Summary: Two sets of three red and white lights
Source: Page 107-108,131 Ref.1

Date: Dec. 27, 1944
Location: France
Time:
Summary: Orange lights, singly and in pairs, suspended in air, moving slowly before disappearing.
Source: Page 108 Ref.1

Date: Dec. 28, 1944
Location: Neuwied / Koblenz Germany
Time:
Summary: A green ball about six inches in diameter motionless and did not appear to have anything supporting it.
Source: Page 108 Ref.1

Date: Dec. 28, 1944
Location: Ardennes, Belgium
Time:
Summary: Large white light no radar contact went straight up at a tremendous speed disappeared.
Source: Page 108-110 Ref.1


Gilliam APA-57 - History

National Maritime Initiative Shipwreck/Hulk Database

Popular Name: APOGON
Location: BIKINI ATOLL LAGOON
Nearest City: BIKINI ISLAND

Owner/Manager: REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
Address: C/O HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
ALELE MUSEUM/BOX #629
MAJURO, MH 96960 Phone: 3264

Is Site on the Shoreline? NO Underwater? YES Depth: 180
Percent Present: 76-100%

Present Remains are Intact? YES Scattered? NO Buried? NO Excavated? NO

Present Remains consist of:
Hull? YES
Masts? NO
Auxiliary Machinery? YES
Anchors? UNKNOWN
Decks? YES
Rigging? NO
Ballast? NO
Cargo? NO
Superstructure? YES
Engines/Boilers? YES
Armament? YES
Associated Material? YES

Archeological Survey? YES Date: 1990
Surveyor: DANIEL J. LENIHAN, NPS
Publication Resulting? YES
Publication Name: NPS CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT NO. 37

Vessel Identity Firmly Established? YES
Source: Archeological? YES Oral History/Tradition? NO Archival? YES

Vessel Name: USS APOGON (SS-308)
Vessel Type: SUBMARINE, BALAO CLASS

# of Masts: 0 Rigging: UNRIGGED
Length: 311.90 Beam: 27.30 Draft: 15.30
Displacement: 1526.00

Hull Materials: STEEL
Engine: DIESEL
Propulsion: SCREW
Armament: 10X21-INCH TT 2X40MM

Year Built: 1943 Place of Construction: PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE Builder: PORTSMOUTH NAVY YARD

Wreck Year: 1946
Use at Loss: TARGET SHIP, OPERATION CROSSROADS
Cargo at Loss: TEST EQUIPMENT

Contact: DANIEL LENIHAN/SUBMERGED CULTURAL RESOURCES UNIT
Phone: 505-988-6750 or FTS-476-1750

National Maritime Initiative Shipwreck/Hulk Database

Popular Name: ARKANSAS
Location: BIKINI ATOLL LAGOON
Nearest City: BIKINI ISLAND

Owner/Manager: REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
Address: C/O HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
ALELE MUSEUM/BOX #629
MAJURO, MH 96960 Phone: 3264

Is Site on the Shoreline? NO Underwater? YES Depth: 180
Percent Present: 76-100%

Present Remains are Intact? YES Scattered? NO Buried? NO Excavated? NO

Present Remains consist of:
Hull? YES
Masts? YES
Auxiliary Machinery? YES
Anchors? YES
Decks? YES
Rigging? YES
Ballast? NO
Cargo? NO
Superstructure? YES
Engines/Boilers? YES
Armament? YES
Associated Material? YES

Archeological Survey? YES Date: 1990
Surveyor: DANIEL J. LENIHAN
Publication Resulting? YES
Publication Name: NPS CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT NO. 37

Vessel Identity Firmly Established? YES
Source: Archeological? YES Oral History/Tradition? NO Archival? YES

Vessel Name: USS ARKANSAS (BB-33)
Vessel Type: BATTLESHIP ARKANSAS CLASS

# of Masts: 2 Rigging: UNRIGGED
Length: 562.00 Beam: 106.00 Draft: 32.00
Displacement: 31900.00

Hull Materials: STEEL
Engine: STEAM TURBINE
Propulsion: SCREW
Armament: 12X12"', 6X5", 10X3", 9X40MM QUADS, 36X20MM

Year Built: 1912 Place of Construction: CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY
Builder: NEW YORK SHIPBUILDING CO.

Wreck Year: 1946
Use at Loss: TARGET SHIP, OPERATION CROSSROADS
Cargo at Loss: TEST EQUIPMENT

Contact: DANIEL LENIHAN/SUBMERGED CULTURAL RESOURCES UNIT
Phone: 505-988-6750 or FTS-476-1750

National Maritime Initiative Shipwreck/Hulk Database

Popular Name: CARLISLE
Location: BIKINI ATOLL LAGOON
Nearest City: BIKINI ISLAND

Owner/Manager: REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
Address: C/O HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
ALELE MUSEUM/BOX #629
MAJURO, MH 96960 Phone: 3264

Is Site on the Shoreline? NO Underwater? YES Depth: 180
Percent Present: 76-100%

Present Remains are Intact? YES Scattered? YES Buried? NO Excavated? NO

Present Remains consist of:
Hull? YES
Masts? YES
Auxiliary Machinery? YES
Anchors? YES
Decks? YES
Rigging? YES
Ballast? NO
Cargo? YES
Superstructure? YES
Engines/Boilers? YES
Armament? YES
Associated Material? YES

Archeological Survey? YES Date: 1990
Surveyor: DANIEL J. LENIHAN, NPS
Publication Resulting? YES
Publication Name: NPS CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT NO. 37

Vessel Identity Firmly Established? YES
Source: Archeological? YES Oral History/Tradition? NO Archival? YES

Vessel Name: USS CARLISLE (APA-69)
Vessel Type: ATTACK TRANSPORT/GILLIAM CLASS

# of Masts: 2 Rigging: UNRIGGED
Length: 426.00 Beam: 58.00 Depth: 37.00 Draft: 15.60
Displacement: 6800.00

Hull Materials: STEEL
Engine: STEAM TURBINES
Propulsion: SCREWS
Armament: 1X5-INCH/38 4X40MM 10X20MM

Year Built: 1944 Place of Construction: WILMINGTON, CALIFORNIA Builder: CONSOLIDATED STEEL CORPORATION

Wreck Year: 1946
Use at Loss: TARGET VESSEL/OPERATION CROSSROADS
Cargo at Loss: TEST EQUIPMENT

Contact: DANIEL LENIHAN/SUBMERGED CULTURAL RESOURCES UNIT
Phone: 505-988-6750 or FTS-476-1750

National Maritime Initiative Shipwreck/Hulk Database

Popular Name: GILLIAM
Location: BIKINI ATOLL LAGOON
Nearest City: BIKINI ISLAND

Owner/Manager: REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
Address: C/O HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
ALELE MUSEUM/BOX #629
MAJURO, MH 96960 Phone: 3264

Is Site on the Shoreline? NO Underwater? YES Depth: 180 Percent Present: 76-100%

Present Remains are Intact? YES Scattered? YES Buried? NO Excavated? NO

Present Remains consist of:
Hull? YES
Masts? YES
Auxiliary Machinery? YES
Anchors? UNKNOWN
Decks? YES
Rigging? UNKNOWN
Ballast? NO
Cargo? YES
Superstructure? YES
Engines/Boilers? YES
Armament? UNKNOWN
Associated Material? YES

Archeological Survey? YES Date: 1989
Surveyor: DANIEL LENIHAN, NPS
Publication Resulting? YES
Publication Name: NPS CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT NO. 37

Vessel Identity Firmly Established? YES
Source: Archeological? YES Oral History/Tradition? NO Archival? YES

Vessel Name: USS GILLIAM (APA-57)
Vessel Type: ATTACK TRANSPORT/GILLIAM CLASS

# of Masts: 0 Rigging: UNRIGGED
Length: 426.00 Beam: 58.00 Depth: 37.00 Draft: 15.60
Displacement: 6800.00

Hull Materials: STEEL
Engine: STEAM TURBINE
Propulsion: SCREW
Armament: 1X5-INCH/38 4X4OMM 10X20MM

Year Built: 1946 Place of Construction: WILMINGTON, CALIFORNIA Builder: CONSOLIDATED STEEL CORPORATION

Wreck Year: 1946
Use at Loss: TARGET SHIP/OPERATION CROSSROADS
Cargo at Loss: TEST EQUIPMENT

Contact: DANIEL LENIHAN/SUBMERGED CULTURAL RESOURCES UNIT
Phone: 505-988-6750 or FTS-476-1750

National Maritime Initiative Shipwreck/Hulk Database

Popular Name: NAGATO
Location: BIKINI ATOLL LAGOON
Nearest City: BIKINI ISLAND

Owner/Manager: REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
Address: C/O HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
ALELE MUSEUM/BOX #629
MAJURO, MH 96960 Phone: 3264

Is Site on the Shoreline? NO Underwater? YES Depth: 180 feet Percent Present: 76-100%

Present Remains are: Intact? YES Scattered? NO Buried? NO Excavated? NO

Present Remains consist of:
Hull? YES
Masts? YES
Auxiliary Machinery? YES
Anchors? YES
Decks? YES
Rigging? NO
Ballast? NO
Cargo? NO
Superstructure? YES
Engines/Boilers? YES
Armament? YES
Associated Material? YES

Archeological Survey? YES Date: 1990
Surveyor: DANIEL J. LENIHAN, NPS
Publication Resulting? YES
Publication Name: NPS CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT NO. 37

Vessel Identity Firmly Established? YES
Source: Archeological? YES Oral History/Tradition? NO Archival? YES

Vessel Name: HIJMS NAGATO (BB-9)
Vessel Type: BATTLESHIP/NAGATO CLASS

# of Masts: 2 Rigging: UNRIGGED
Length: 708.00 Beam: 95.00 Draft: 30.00
Displacement: 38500.00

Hull Materials: STEEL
Engine: STEAM TURBINE
Propulsion: SCREW
Armament: 8X16", 20X5.5"', 4X3.1"AA, 3MGS, 8X21"TT(4 AW/4 VW)

Year Built: 1912 Place of Construction: KURE, JAPAN
Builder: KURE DY

Wreck Year: 1946
Use at Loss: TARGET SHIP, OPERATION CROSSROADS
Cargo at Loss: TEST EQUIPMENT

Contact: DANIEL LENIHAN/SUBMERGED CULTURAL RESOURCES UNIT
Phone: 505-988-6750 or FTS-476-1750

National Maritime Initiative Shipwreck/Hulk Database

Popular Name: PILOTFISH
Location: BIKINI ATOLL LAGOON
Nearest City: BIKINI ISLAND
Owner/Manager: REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
Address: C/O HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
ALELE MUSEUM/BOX #629
MAJURO, MH 96960 Phone: 3264

Is Site on the Shoreline? NO Underwater? YES Depth: 170 Percent Present: 76-100%

Present Remains are Intact? YES Scattered? NO Buried? NO Excavated? NO

Present Remains consist of:
Hull? YES
Masts? NO
Auxiliary Machinery? YES
Anchors? UNKNOWN
Decks? YES
Rigging? NO
Ballast? NO
Cargo? NO
Superstructure? YES
Engines/Boilers? YES
Armament? YES
Associated Material? YES

Archeological Survey? YES Date: 1989
Surveyor: DANIEL J. LENIHAN, NPS
Publication Resulting? YES
Publication Name: NPS CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT NO. 37

Vessel Identity Firmly Established? YES
Source: Archeological? YES Oral History/Tradition? NO Archival? YES

Vessel Name: USS PILOTFISH (SS-386)
Vessel Type: SUBMARINE, BALAO CLASS

# of Masts: 0 Rigging: UNRIGGED
Length: 311.80 Beam: 27.30 Draft: 15.30
Displacement: 1525.00

Hull Materials: STEEL
Engine: GE/GM DIESEL-ELECTRIC
Propulsion: SCREW
Armament: 10X21-INCH TT 1X20MM 1X40MM

Year Built: 1943 Place of Construction: PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE Builder: PORTSMOUTH NAVY YARD

Wreck Year: 1946
Use at Loss: TARGET VESSEL/OPERATION CROSSROADS
Cargo at Loss: TEST EQUIPMENT

Contact: DANIEL LENIHAN/SUBMERGED CULTURAL RESOURCES UNIT
Phone: 505-988-6750 or FTS-476-1750

National Maritime Initiative Shipwreck/Hulk Database

Popular Name: PRINZ EUGEN
Location: KWAJALEIN ATOLL LAGOON
Nearest City: CARLSON ISLAND

Owner/Manager: U.S. NAVY
Address: C/O NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON, DC 20374
Phone: 202-433-6437

Is Site on the Shoreline? YES Underwater? YES Depth: 120 Percent Present: 76-100%

Present Remains are Intact? YES Scattered? NO Buried? NO Excavated? NO

Present Remains consist of:
Hull? YES
Masts? YES
Auxiliary Machinery? YES
Anchors? YES
Decks? YES
Rigging? YES
Ballast? NO
Cargo? NO
Superstructure? YES
Engines/Boilers? YES
Armament? YES
Associated Material? YES

Archeological Survey? YES Date: 1989
Surveyor: DANIEL J. LENIHAN
Publication Resulting? YES
Publication Name: NPS CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT NO. 37

Vessel Identity Firmly Established? YES
Source: Archeological? YES Oral History/Tradition? YES Archival? YES

Vessel Name: USS PRINZ EUGEN (IX-300)
Vessel Type: CRUISER, HIPPER CLASS

# of Masts: 2 Rigging: UNRIGGED
Length: 654.50 Beam: 71.00 Draft: 15.00
Displacement: 10000.00

Hull Materials: STEEL
Engine: GEARED TURBINES
Propulsion: SCREW
Armament: 8X8", 12X4.1", AA, 12X37MM AA, 12X21"TT, 4AC/6X8" SUNK

Year Built: 1936 Place of Construction: KIEL, GERMANY
Builder: KRUPP AT GERMANIA WERFT SHIPYARD

Wreck Year: 194.6
Use at Loss: LAID UP AFTER OPERATION CROSSROADS
Cargo at Loss: TEST EQUIPMENT

Contact: DANIEL LENIHAN/SUBMERGED CULTURAL RESOURCES UNIT
Phone: 505-988-6750 or FTS-476-1750

National Maritime Initiative Shipwreck/Hulk Database

Popular Name: SARATOGA
Location: BIKINI ATOLL LAGOON
Nearest City: BIKINI ISLAND

Owner/Manager: REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
Address: C/O HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
ALELE MUSEUM/BOX #629
MAJURO, MH 96960 Phone: 3264

Is Site on the Shoreline? No Underwater? YES Depth: 180
Percent Present: 76-100%

Present Remains are Intact? YES Scattered? NO Buried? NO Excavated? NO

Present Remains consist of:
Hull? YES
Masts? YES
Auxiliary Machinery? YES
Anchors? YES
Decks? YES
Rigging? YES
Ballast? NO
Cargo? YES
Superstructure? YES
Engines/Boilers? YES
Armament? YES
Associated Material? YES

Archeological Survey? YES Date: 1990
Surveyor: DANIEL J. LENIHAN, NPS
Publication Resulting? YES
Publication Name: NPS CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT NO. 37

Vessel Identity Firmly Established? YES
Source: Archeological? YES Oral History/Tradition? NO Archival? YES

Vessel Name: USS SARATOGA (CV-3)
Vessel Type: AIRCRAFT CARRIER/LEXINGTON CLASS

# of Masts: 1 Rigging: UNRIGGED
Length: 880.00 Beam: 106.00 Draft: 24.10
Displacement: 33000.00

Hull Materials: STEEL
Engine: STEAM TURBINES
Propulsion: SCREW
Armament: 8X8", 12X5", 4-6 PDRS. 81 AC

Year Built: 1922 Place of Construction: CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY Builder: NEW YORK SHIPBUILDING CO.

Wreck Year: 1946
Use at Loss: TARGET SHIP, OPERATIONS CROSSROADS
Cargo at Loss: TEST EQUIPMENT

Contact: DANIEL LENIHAN/SUBMERGED CULTURAL RESOURCES UNIT
Phone: 505-988-6750 or FTS-476-1750


Gilliam APA-57 - History

USS Fallon at Pearl Harbor on 22 March 1946.
Click on this photograph for links to larger images of this class.

Class: GILLIAM (APA-57)
Design: MC S4-SE2-BD1
Displacement (tons): 4,247 light, 7,080 lim.
Dimensions (feet): 426.0' oa, 400.0' pp x 58.0' e x 16.0' lim.
Original Armament: 1-5"/38 4-40mmT 10-20mm (1944-45: all)
Later armaments: 1-5"/38 4-40mm T 4-20mm (1946-47: APA-64)
1-5"/38 3-40mm T 4-20mm (1946-47: APA-73)
1-5"/38 2-40mm T 10>4-20mm (1946-47: APA 60-61, 70-71, 77, 79, 81)
1-5"/38 1-40mm T 4-20mm (1946-47: APA-88)
1-5"/38 4-20mm (1946-47: APA-74)
2-20mm (1947-49: APA-63, APA/IX-67)
Complement: 326 (1944)
Speed (kts.): 16.9
Propulsion (HP): 6,000
Machinery: Westinghouse turbo-electric, 2 screws

Construction:

APA Name Ord. Builder Keel Launch Commiss.
57 GILLIAM 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 30 Nov 43 28 Mar 44 1 Aug 44
58 APPLING 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 7 Dec 43 9 Apr 44 22 Aug 44
59 AUDRAIN 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 11 Dec 43 21 Apr 44 2 Sep 44
60 BANNER 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 24 Jan 44 3 May 44 16 Sep 44
61 BARROW 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 28 Jan 44 11 May 44 28 Sep 44
62 BERRIEN 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 23 Feb 44 20 May 44 8 Oct 44
63 BLADEN 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 8 Mar 44 31 May 44 18 Oct 44
64 BRACKEN 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 13 Mar 44 10 Jun 44 4 Oct 44
65 BRISCOE 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 29 Mar 44 19 Jun 44 29 Oct 44
66 BRULE 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 10 Apr 44 30 Jun 44 31 Oct 44
67 BURLESON 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 22 Apr 44 11 Jul 44 8 Nov 44
68 BUTTE 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 4 May 44 20 Jul 44 22 Nov 44
69 CARLISLE 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 12 May 44 30 Jul 44 29 Nov 44
70 CARTERET 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 22 May 44 15 Aug 44 3 Dec 44
71 CATRON 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 1 Jun 44 28 Aug 44 28 Nov 44
72 CLARENDON 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 12 Jun 44 12 Sep 44 14 Dec 44
73 CLEBURNE 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 20 Jun 44 27 Sep 44 22 Dec 44
74 COLUSA 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 1 Jul 44 7 Oct 44 20 Dec 44
75 CORTLAND 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 12 Jul 44 18 Oct 44 1 Jan 45
76 CRENSHAW 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 21 Jul 44 27 Oct 44 4 Jan 45
77 CRITTENDEN 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 31 Jul 44 6 Nov 44 17 Jan 45
78 CULLMAN 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 16 Aug 44 18 Nov 44 25 Jan 45
79 DAWSON 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 29 Aug 44 27 Nov 44 4 Feb 45
80 ELKHART 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 13 Sep 44 5 Dec 44 8 Feb 45
81 FALLON 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 28 Sep 44 14 Dec 44 14 Feb 45
82 FERGUS 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 7 Oct 44 24 Dec 44 20 Feb 45
83 FILLMORE 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 19 Oct 44 4 Jan 45 25 Feb 45
84 GARRARD 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 28 Oct 44 13 Jan 45 3 Mar 45
85 GASCONADE 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 7 Nov 44 23 Jan 45 11 Mar 45
86 GENEVA 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 18 Nov 44 31 Jan 45 22 Mar 45
87 NIAGARA 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 28 Nov 44 10 Feb 45 29 Mar 45
88 PRESIDIO 25 May 43 Consolidated Steel, Wilm. 6 Dec 44 17 Feb 45 9 Apr 45

Disposition:
APA Name Decomm. Strike Disposal Fate MA Sale
57 GILLIAM -- 15 Aug 46 1 Jul 46 Tgt. --
58 APPLING 20 Dec 46 4 Apr 47 31 Mar 48 MC/R 15 Jul 68
59 AUDRAIN 15 May 46 1 Aug 47 25 Jul 47 MC/R 7 Nov 72
60 BANNER 28 Aug 46 12 Mar 48 16 Feb 48 Dest. --
61 BARROW 28 Aug 46 28 May 48 11 May 48 Dest. --
62 BERRIEN 17 May 46 1 Aug 47 12 Aug 47 MC/R 17 May 66
63 BLADEN 26 Dec 46 20 Oct 53 3 Aug 53 MA/D 15 Jul 55
64 BRACKEN 28 Aug 46 5 Apr 48 10 Mar 48 Dest. --
65 BRISCOE 28 Aug 46 13 Jul 48 6 May 48 Dest. --
66 BRULE 28 Aug 46 28 May 48 11 May 48 Dest. --
67 BURLESON 9 Nov 46 1 Sep 68 8 Nov 68 MA/S 8 Nov 68
68 BUTTE 28 Aug 46 28 May 48 12 May 48 Dest. --
69 CARLISLE -- 15 Aug 46 1 Jul 46 Tgt. --
70 CARTERET 28 Aug 46 30 Apr 48 19 Apr 48 Dest. --
71 CATRON 28 Aug 46 13 Jul 48 6 May 48 Dest. --
72 CLARENDON 9 Apr 46 8 May 46 28 Jun 46 MC/R 21 Nov 63
73 CLEBURNE 7 Jun 46 1 Aug 47 23 Jul 47 MC/R 16 Jun 65
74 COLUSA 16 May 46 1 Aug 47 14 Aug 47 MC/R 12 Aug 65
75 CORTLAND 31 Dec 46 4 Apr 47 31 Mar 48 MC/R 14 Jul 66
76 CRENSHAW 19 Apr 46 3 Jul 46 30 Jun 46 MC/R 7 Dec 64
77 CRITTENDEN 28 Aug 46 21 Oct 48 6 Oct 48 Dest. --
78 CULLMAN 22 May 46 3 Jul 46 1 Jul 46 MC/R 12 Aug 65
79 DAWSON 28 Aug 46 30 Apr 48 19 Apr 48 Dest. --
80 ELKHART 12 Apr 46 21 May 46 28 Jun 46 MC/R 7 Jan 64
81 FALLON 28 Aug 46 5 Apr 48 10 Mar 48 Dest. --
82 FERGUS 25 Jun 46 17 Jul 47 4 Sep 47 MC/R 16 Jun 65
83 FILLMORE 24 Jan 47 25 Feb 47 1 Apr 48 MC/R 13 Sep 66
84 GARRARD 16 Apr 46 21 May 46 30 Jun 46 MC/R 17 May 65
85 GASCONADE 28 Aug 46 12 Aug 48 21 Jul 48 Dest. --
86 GENEVA 23 Jan 47 25 Feb 47 2 Apr 48 MC/R 20 Oct 66
87 NIAGARA 12 Dec 46 23 Mar 49 5 Feb 50 Sold --
88 PRESIDIO 20 Jun 46 1 Aug 47 2 Sep 47 MC/R 16 Jun 65

Class Notes:
FY 1942 (APA 57-75), 1944 (others). On 8 Aug 42 the loss of a combat loaded transport, GEORGE F. ELLIOT (AP-13), off Guadalcanal underlined the risks of having too many troops and supplies in a single large hull. (This lesson was reinforced in November by the loss of five combat loaded APs and the disabling of a sixth in the Northern Africa invasions.) An additional problem with large transports was that no shipbuilding ways capable of building them to Navy designs would be available before 1 Aug 44. On 30 Sep 42 CominCh sent to VCNO tentative specifications for "small combat loaded transports" and "small combat loaded cargo vessels" and asked for preliminary designs. His 5,000-ton, 380-foot (wl) AP was to carry 30 officers and 600 troops (about half of a combat team), with 60,000 cubic feet of cargo at a sustained speed of 15 knots and was to have two sets of Welin davits per side and room for 15 landing craft. The AK was to be of the same size and speed but with more cargo and less troop capacity. BuShips submitted a preliminary design for the AP on 1 Nov 42.

On 28 Dec 42 CominCh referred to the JCS a program for 32 AP's and 32 AK's of the small combat-loaded type, pointing out that the converted ships then being used were too large (requiring excessive time for unloading), carried more troops than desired in individual combat units (concentrating troops and materials too much on the assault line), and had too much draft for use in many places where campaigns might take place. CominCh added that Navy officials, after considering a large transport design produced in September 1942 based on the DIXIE (AD-14) class of destroyer tenders, the intermediate DOYEN (AP-1) type (which also carried more troops than desired in a combat unit and had three feet too much draft), and the new small type, were unanimous in regarding the small type as the one "most suitable to all types of military requirements." The number of ships in the program was based on a calculation that the Navy would need 32 each of the small AP's and AK's to replace the 22 large APs and 8 large AKs that it expected to lose in 1943 and 1944. (A large AP had about 14/9ths the capacity of the small one while a large AK had about 4 times the capacity of the small type.) The Navy proposed that the Maritime Commission build the vessels.

On 8 Jan 43 the JCS approved the program for 32 small AP's and 32 small AK's and asked the MC if it could build the ships. The MC agreed on 17 Feb 43 and, upon receipt of a JCS directive of 25 Feb 43, contracted for the ships under its Military Program. The MC produced its S4-SE2-BD1 design, enlarged it to accommodate the only main propulsion machinery that was readily obtainable (a twin-screw turbo-electric plant), and presented it to the Navy on 25 Feb 43. This final design provided for a 6,000-ton, 400-foot (wl) APA that would carry 46 troop officers, 800 men, and 60,000 cubic feet of cargo at a sustained speed of 16.5 knots on a draft of at most 15.5 feet. The same hull and machinery designs were used for the AKA-21 class. On 10 Jan 44 the Auxiliary Vessels Board recommended acquiring the ships by transfer of title from the MC upon their completion. The ships were formally acquired by the Navy from the MC one day before commissioning except APA-58, 65, 66, and 83 (on commissioning date) and 72, 74 and 87 (2 days before commissioning). The tonnage of APA 57-75 was charged against the 1799 Vessels Emergency Construction Act of 6 Feb 42, hence their early FY date.

All except APA-72, 76, 78, 80, and 84 went to Pearl Harbor in early 1946 for use in the Bikini atomic bomb tests (Operation Crossroads). Of these 27 ships, two were sunk in the first test, twelve remained afloat but damaged and radioactive in the target array and were towed to Kwajalein for decommissioning, assessment and subsequent sinking, seven were present at Bikini outside the main target array and were re-manned after the test and remained in service, and six were decommissioned at Pearl Harbor before the tests. APPLING (APA-58) was selected in late July or early August 1946 to be the "detector vessel" for a third test at Bikini (Test Charlie). She was to be fitted as LSM-60 had been for the second test to lower the bomb in a pressure chamber (a spare submarine conning tower) to the depth at which it would be detonated. Like LSM-60 she would have disappeared in the explosion, but Test Charlie was cancelled.


References

  1. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), Fifth edition. American Psychiatric Association. 2013
  2. The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. (2018). Conversion Therapy. https://www.aacap.org/AACAP/Policy_Statements/ 2018/Conversion_Therapy.aspx. Accessed November 7, 2020.
  3. Turban, J. L., Beckwith, N., Reisner, S. L., & Keuroghlian, A. S. (2020). Association between recalled exposure to gender identity conversion efforts and psychological distress and suicide attempts among transgender adults. JAMA Psychiatry, 77(1), 68-76.
  4. Durwood, L., McLaughlin, K. A., & Olson, K. R. (2017). Mental health and self-worth in socially transitioned transgender youth. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 56(2), 116-123.
  5. Olson, K. R., Durwood, L., DeMeules, M., & McLaughlin, K. A. (2016). Mental health of transgender children who are supported in their identities. Pediatrics, 137(3).
  6. Scheim, A. I., Perez-Brumer, A. G., & Bauer, G. R. (2020). Gender-concordant identity documents and mental health among transgender adults in the USA: a cross-sectional study. The Lancet Public Health.
  7. Hembree, W. C., Cohen-Kettenis, P. T., Gooren, L., Hannema, S. E., Meyer, W. J., Murad, M. H., . & T&rsquoSjoen, G. G. (2017). Endocrine treatment of gender-dysphoric/gender-incongruent persons: an endocrine society clinical practice guideline.The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 102(11), 3869-3903.
  8. Coleman, E., Bockting, W., Botzer, M., Cohen-Kettenis, P., DeCuypere, G., Feldman, J., . & Monstrey, S. (2012). Standards of care for the health of transsexual, transgender, and gender-nonconforming people, version 7.International journal of transgenderism, 13(4), 165-232.
  9. Klein, A., & Golub, S. A. (2016). Family rejection as a predictor of suicide attempts and substance misuse among transgender and gender nonconforming adults. LGBT health, 3(3), 193-199.
  10. Reisner, S. L., Poteat, T., Keatley, J., Cabral, M., Mothopeng, T., Dunham, E., . & Baral, S. D. (2016). Global health burden and needs of transgender populations: a review.The Lancet, 388(10042), 412-436.
  11. James, S., Herman, J., Rankin, S., Keisling, M., Mottet, L., & Anafi, M. A. (2016). The Report of The 2015 US Transgender Survey. http://www.ustranssurvey.org/reports. Accessed November 7, 2020.
  12. Perzanowski, E. S., Ferraiolo, T., & Keuroghlian, A. S. (2020). Overview and Terminology. In Forcier, M., VanSchalkwyk, G., & Turban, J.L. (Eds.), Pediatric Gender Identity: Gender-affirming Care for Transgender & Gender Diverse Youth (pp. 1-13). Springer Nature.

Physician Review By:

Jack Turban, M.D., M.H.S.
November 2020

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APA-57 Gilliam-class attack transports

Launched on March 28, 1944, Gilliam was the first of 32 Gilliam-class attack transports, specially designed vessels that served as amphibious ships. Unlike conventional freighters and transports, attack transports were designed to unload their cargoes over the side into landing craft which they carried in a sense their beaching craft were their main batteries.

USS Gilliam was a welded steel vessel 426 feet long overall, with a waterline length of 400 feet, an extreme beam of 58 feet, a maximum depth of hold of 37 feet, and a 15.6-foot draft. Gilliam displaced 6,800 tons standard. The twin screws were driven by Westinghouse Steam Turbines that developed 6,000 shaft horsepower at 18 knots. Steam was provided by two oil-burning Babcock and Wilcox boilers. The vessel was armed with a single 5-inch/38 caliber gun, four twin-mounted 40mm Bofors antiaircraft guns, and ten single 20mm Oerlikon guns. Gilliam carried thirteen LCVPs (Landing Craft Vehicles, Personnel), one LCPL (Landing Craft Personnel, Large), and 1,032 tons of cargo or 849 troops. The superstructure was located in the center of the ship two masts, one forward and one aft, were fitted with booms and steam winches that handled cargo and the ship's landing craft.

USS Gilliam, a type S4-SE2-BU1 transport, was built under a U.S. Maritime Commission contract in 1944 by the Consolidated Steel Corporation of Wilmington, California. Gilliam was acquired by the U.S. Navy on July 31, 1944, and commissioned the next day as APA-57. Gilliam departed San Francisco Bay on October 16, 1944, with 750 Army troops bound for New Guinea. Gilliam ferried troops to the Philippines in support of the reconquest of those islands and served as a receiving ship for crews and injured personnel of damaged or lost warships during the Battle of Leyte Gulf. Gilliam also participated in the assault on Okinawa. At the war's end the transport carried occupation troops to Sasebo, Japan, and ferried returning troops home as part of Operation "Magic Carpet."

Gilliam was selected as a target vessel for Operation Crossroads. Arriving at Pearl Harbor on February 16, 1946, the ship was readied for the tests. Gilliam was moored aft of Nevada, the projected target for the Able test detonation. The bomb instead detonated off Nevada and close to Gilliam, "the only ship located within 1,000 feet of the projected zeropoint." The vessel sank in less than two minutes.

USS CARLISLE (APA-69) was ordered to Pearl Harbor for assignment to Joint Task Force One for Operation Crossroads. Arriving at Pearl on February 4, the ship was "stripped" during that month before sailing to Bikini Atoll as one of eighteen attack transports slated for the tests. Moored close to Gilliam, Carlisle was sunk by the Able test burst on July 1, 1946. USS Carlisle was stricken from the Navy Register on August 15, 1946.


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Product Description

USS Gilliam APA 57

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Gilliam APA-57 - History

A few months ago Wallace Vernon (photo 01) wrote in his Eldon Advertiser weekly column about the forced closing of dealerships across our nation by General Motors including our own Lloyd Belt dealership in Eldon.


01 Wallace Vernon

Without getting into the politics of this unusual interference of government in a private business, Wallace reminisced that we now have no new car dealerships in the county. I thought the summary of what he remembered about our Miller County car dealerships (most of which were in Eldon) was interesting and would be a good way to introduce the subject of this week&rsquos narrative, the Eads family of Iberia. But first, here is Wallace&rsquos essay:

Auto Dealers of Miller County

Wallace Vernon
Eldon Advertiser 2009

The closing of the Belt Auto Group set the Ex Publisher to reminiscing and ruminating as to what past auto dealerships that group represented. As EP remembers it the original Burlingame/Belt agency was a direct descendant of the Bill Crigler Pontiac garage and agency located on South Maple Street just north of the present dance studio, joined at sometime or other by Ernie Kallenbach&rsquos Buick dealership, and later absorbed by what was originally Tompkins Chevrolet-Oldsmobile-GMC dealership, and more recently combined with descendents of the old Ernie Jones Chrysler-Plymouth-Dodge-Desoto dealership, which picked up Jeep someplace along the line.

Other mid century Eldon auto businesses included Vanosdoll Ford, Clark Brothers Studebaker and Taylor Kaiser-Frazer-Henry J. dealerships. Kallenbach Buick also sold International trucks. Eldon even had a franchised Tucker dealer, but the automobiles never made it to the showrooms.

Dealers of foreign makes are late comers and never gained foothold in Eldon. Other makes, not offered in Eldon were sometimes in evidence about town. Vanosdoll himself often sported a Lincoln Zephyr and the Tompkins&rsquo drove Cadillacs at times. Theatre owner Tom Edwards was partial to Packards, Grassy Crum turned heads with a beauty of a Hudson Hornet, R. T. Mudd&rsquos Rolls Royce and a LaSalle (or was it a LaFayette) driven by one of the McKinleys were common sights on the streets.

A number of the Chrysler and GM brands (Plymouth, DeSoto, Oldsmobile, etc. were discontinued in more recent years).

Ex Pub also recalls that other automobile dealerships once thrived in Miller County, Perkins and Law Chevrolet and Eads Ford in Iberia and Lucian Mace&rsquos Chrysler agency in Tuscumbia.

The following week, Wallace presented an addendum to the previous week&rsquos column:

There&rsquos more to Eldon&rsquos automobile history than meets the eye. First off, John Beard says I didn&rsquot mention Alford Pontiac Company in my rundown of previous Eldon dealers. He&rsquos certainly right--Alford was in between Crigler and Burlingame, as were a number of other in betweens in other agencies leading to the Belt Auto Group.

Closer to home, though, comes a letter from Kent Kehr indicating that his grandfather, P.O. Kehr might have been the original Chevrolet dealer here, which was news to the First Wife and sister Nancy who always thought that Grandad Claude and Pop, Harry Tompkins, were the founders. C.T. as he was known had been a Willys Overland dealer in Atlanta in 1912, and Ford dealer in Shelbina in 1922, before coming to Eldon in 1927.

Back to the microfilm and sure enough Kehr Motor Company was advertising in the pages of The Eldon Advertiser in August of 1927, but notice of the sale of Kehr Motors to one R. M. Avery, of Fayette was announced in that very month.

The September 1, 1927 Eldon Advertiser noted that Tompkins Chevrolet Company was opening a new Chevrolet agency in the Kehr Bros. Motor Company brick building on South Maple Street. (Wonder what became of Avery!)

Among sister Nancy&rsquos files are papers of incorporation for Tompkins Chevrolet dated March 19, 1929.

As to who was the first Ford dealer in the county, Clark Vanosdol of Eldon and James Alfro Eads of Iberia would be very close. Recently, John Vanosdoll, grandson of Clark, wrote me the following: &ldquoMy grandfather, Clark Vanosdoll, signed a contract with Ford Motor Co. in January, 1914, and I do have a copy of it.&rdquo In the near future I hope to write more about the Vanosdoll family of Eldon. According to information supplied me by the Eads family, Alf Eads began his Ford dealership in 1913. Here is a short biography of Alf Eads by Gerard Schultz in his book, History of Miller County written in 1933:

James Alfro Eads (photo 02) , owner of J.A. Eads Ford Motor Company at Iberia, was born September 15, 1888, near Vienna, Missouri.


02 James Alfro Eads

His father, Joseph T. Eads (photo 03) , was born near Vienna on November 25, 1864, and his mother, Isabella (von Gremp) Eads, was born near Vienna also. His mother's ancestors came from Germany, while his paternal ancestors were natives of the South.


03 Front: Joseph Thomas Eads - Back: Glenn Robinson

On May 9, 1909, at Iberia, Mr. Eads was married to Miss Lou Bond, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Bond, natives of Miller County and of Kentucky, respectively (photos 04 and 05) .


04 Lou Bond Eads: b.1884 - d.1973


05 James Alfro Eads and Lou Bond Eads 50th

They were parents of seven children: Vern Gwendolyn and Veta Geraldine, who are graduates of Drury College Catherine Lorene, who graduated from Iberia Academy in 1932 Henry Ford, who graduated from Iberia Academy in 1933 Mary Rosalie James Wendell and Omega Dean. Vera was married in 1933 to Oral Atwell.

For over 20 years Mr. Eads was manager of the Iberia Telephone Exchange. In 1913 he bought the first car in Iberia, a Sterling. He became a Ford dealer in the fall of 1913. He now owns a Stinson cabin plane, the first in Iberia and is the only licensed airplane pilot in the county (photo 06) .

He is a distributor of Shell Products (photo 07) .


07 Shell Oil Company Truck

Mr. Eads has been a member of the Public School Board and of the Town Board of Iberia. In politics he usually supports the Democratic Party. He belongs to the Nazarene Church. Mrs. Eads is a Baptist.

I travelled to Iberia last week to talk with Betty Eads, wife of Alf&rsquos son, James (Jim) Wendell Eads, who passed away just a few years ago, and their daughter, Karen Atwill (photo 08) .


08 Karen Atwill and Betty Eads

As Gerard Schultz noted above, Betty told me Alf came with his brother to Iberia from Maries County where they were born and raised to be a driver for Dr. William von Gremp in Iberia (photo 09) .

The family history of the Eads is interesting and has been researched rather extensively. Below is listed the home website of the Eads family genealogy for those who want to pursue it further:

The next website below is the fifth page of this very extensive genealogical research where you will find Joseph T. Eads, father of Alf Eads:

Once you pull up this website and find the listing of Alf&rsquos father, Joseph T. Eads, you will notice the listing is incomplete because it doesn&rsquot include Alf&rsquos name however, as Schultz noted above, Joseph T. Eads is the father of Alf. Joseph was married to a von Gremp. I&rsquom not sure of the exact relation to Dr. von Gremp of Iberia, but since Dr. von Gremp also was from Vienna I imagine that he was an uncle or some other close relative to Alf thus explaining the motivation for Alf to come to Iberia to live.

The amazing thing about Alf was how quickly he became a successful business person in Iberia. As noted above by Schultz, he not only was a Shell Oil Company distributor but also managed the Iberia Telephone Company eventually becoming its owner. Here is a photo of one of the Shell gas pump emblems held for the photo by Karen (photo 10) .

And here is a photo of the Iberia Telephone Exchange switch box which Betty and Karen donated to our museum (photo 11) .


11 Iberia Switch Box

Early on, before he became a Ford car dealer, Alf helped put in the telephone lines for Iberia. Here is an old photo showing him at the top of a telephone pole (photo 12) :

Alf certainly wasn&rsquot afraid of heights because he also was one of the first in Miller County to fly his own airplane. Here is another photo of Alf standing with Squire John Ferguson and Alf&rsquos first airplane, the Stinson (photo 13) :


13 John Ferguson and Alf Eads

Alf&rsquos first dealership office was in his home. But later he built on to the home a large service garage addition which is still present in Iberia today. In this early photo (photo 14) of the garage taken in 1915 the caption reads:

&ldquoThis photo was taken in front of Eads Garage around 1915. Pictured from left-right: Harry Lovell, Emery Robertson, Everett Wilson, Luther Dickerson, Everett Malmberg, unknown, J.A. Eads. Ford Eads is on the tractor and an Eads girl is in the truck. In the doorway: Gerald Gardner and Clarence Driver. Seated on bench: Ray Casey and Clint Condra.&rdquo


14 Eads Garage - 1915

Here are a couple of other photos of the garage (photos 15 and 16) :


15 Second Ead&rsquos Garage Building constructed early 1950&rsquos
J. Alfro Eads in Door - Mrs. J. Alfro Eads in door of House


16 On Rooftop - Eads Motor Workers and assorted Children

Peggy Hake has written the following about the old Eads Garage in the Miller County Autogram May 27, 2010:

The old Eads Motor Company building was begun in the early 20th century and became the local Ford dealership for Iberia and surrounding area in 1913. The present building has been there for many years and the Eads family donated it to the City of Iberia after the death of James Eads a few years ago.

About 1915, there was a two-story frame house sitting to the south of the building, the home of Alf and Lou (Bond) Eads. They reared their children in the old home. It was still standing in the l940s when I was growing up in the town of Iberia. Sometime in the 1950s, the old home was razed and a brick, two-storey building was constructed and is still there today, a part of the Eads Motor Company.

There is an old picture in existence of several men standing in front of the motor company&rsquos garages and offices. They have been identified as Happy Lovell, Emery Robertson, Everett Wilson, Luther Dickerson, &lsquoAlf&rsquo Eads, Ray Casey and Clint Condra.

Also, two young boys were standing inside the large garage entrance--Gerald Gardner and Clarence Driver (black), Two children were also identified in the old photo---Catherine Eads (sitting inside a truck) and Ford Eads sitting on an old tractor.

There is a structure standing to the north of the Eads building and it was believed to be an old barber shop. That building is now gone and later another one was moved there circa 1924, which was once the old Bank of Iberia. It once housed a hardware store and an electric shop and today is unoccupied.

NOTE: In the old photo with this article (photo 14 above) one can see a quaint gasoline pump situated in front of the garage doors. James/Jim Eads, son of the original owner (Alf Eads), told me before his death that his father once made a statement that he had never seen this type or model of a gasoline pump in his years as a Ford dealer nor could Jim remember seeing one around the old garage when he was a child.

Alf attended one of the Ford company&rsquos first national dealer meetings in Detroit probably held before 1920. A photo of that event was donated to us by the Eads family. It was said that all the Ford dealers in the country were represented in that one photo. I copy here the section with Alf. He is fifth from the left of the kneeling gentlemen in the first row (photo 17) :


17 Alf Fifth from Left - Kneeling First Row (highlighted)

For completeness here is the full photo (photo 18) :

Alf also was the Ford distributor for the Fordson Tractor and later models of the Ford tractor. He attended one of the early training sessions for Ford Tractor dealers in Kansas City (photo 19) . Alf is in the third row down from the top underneath the &ldquoF&rdquo painted on the window.

Alf had a close association with the Iberia William Driver family. Here is an early photo in which Bill Driver is at the wheel with Alf in the back seat and his son Henry Ford Eads in the passenger seat (photo 20) .


20 Bill Driver (Driving) - Henry Ford Eads (Front) - Alf Eads (Rear)

Some twenty years afterward Alf was photographed in front of a later model Ford (photo 21) .

Here are some dealership momentos of Alf&rsquos Ford motor company (photos 22 through 26) :


22 Advertisement


23 Check from Eads


25 Inspection and Service Record Book

This key board held for the camera by Karen holds keys which served as templates for key reproduction (photo 27) .

In those days, a key number wasn&rsquot sufficient to replace a lost key. The original template had to be used.

Alf was one of the early private aviators in the country. His interest in aviation led to one of the most notable Iberia historical events which was the construction of Miller County&rsquos first airport on the Alf Eads farm near Iberia. Peggy Hake has written about that event:

EADS AVIATION
by Peggy Smith Hake

Miller County's first airport was dedicated at Iberia on Saturday, May 30, 1933. The name given the new airfield was Eads Airport, which still stands today less than a mile west of Iberia on the old Iberia-Ulman road. The field first consisted of 50 acres. In 1941, it was expanded to 130 acres by the purchase of an additional 80 acres. It was then one of the largest ports in central Missouri, larger than the Jefferson City field although it was not as well equipped.

This past May was the 69th anniversary of Miller County's first airport. It was a very important day all those years ago when the airport was dedicated at Iberia. It was estimated that 2,000 people came to the dedication ceremony with aircraft flown in from St. Louis, Jefferson City, Springfield, Bagnell Dam, and East St. Louis, Illinois.

It was an exciting day for the residents of Iberia. The merchants closed their doors and busy farmers deserted their plow handles to attend the official opening on that Saturday in late May which had been designated as "Lindbergh Day" across the country. It was an appropriate day for an airport dedication. One of the special events featured James G. Haizlip who had just won a trans-continental race. The cross-country flight lasted 10 hours and 19 minutes. James had flown 2500 miles from Los Angeles to New York just the year before and had been awarded the Bendix Trophy for his transcontinental flight. His wife, Mae Haizlip, who accompanied him to Iberia, was the winner of the women's speed record----she won this national race in 1932 at Cleveland, Ohio. Her speed was clocked at 265 miles per hour!

James G. Haizlip dedicated the new Eads Airport that day. He was the Assistant Manager of the Shell Petroleum Corporation's aviation department. Other performers during the day included a parachuting team called "The Three Black Cats". The three-man team consisted of Joe Switlik, William Hutchins, and Carl Lange from East St. Louis, Illinois. They flew into the airport in a Monocoach plane and used it in their stunt show. They parachuted from a height of 2200 feet, wore two parachutes each, and landed safely about one-quarter mile from the airport.

Other stunt performers were Walter Looney and Leonard Trowbridge of Springfield, flying an American Eagle, (a three-cylinder airplane). James Malone, accompanied by Ford Eads, son of Alf and Lou (Bond) Eads of Iberia, did some somersaults, rolls, tail spins, etc. in the Ead's Stinson aircraft. Other well-known aviators of the area were in attendance that day, including Harold Law and G. S. Salley in their Monocoupe from Jefferson City W. E. Keith, Leslie Boos, and Louis Wilbers of LW Airways, in a Robin plane, also of Jefferson City and B. M. Tuxhorn of Kansas City.

J. A. Eads of Iberia began to take flying lessons about 1931 and in December 1932, he bought a new Stinson, four-place cabin monoplane from B. M. Tuxhorn of Kansas City and in July 1933, obtained his private pilot's license. He could fly to St. Louis in 1 hour and 10 minutes while it took four hours by auto (photo 28) .

The following photos were taken at the time of the opening day celebration of the Eads airport (photos 29 and 30) :


29 Airport Dedication


30 Airport Dedication

Alf and Squire John Ferguson were good friends. Alf even took Squire John for a ride in his airplane (photo 31) .


31 Alf Eads and John Ferguson

A hanger for the airport was also built (photo 32) :


32 Eads Airport Hanger

Certainly, James Alfro Eads was one of Miller County&rsquos most successful and interesting business men who not only brought employment to Iberia but also gave of his time in service to the community. He passed away in 1969 at the age of 81. Here is a copy of the funeral program with some more biographical details (photo 33) :

James Wendell Eads, Alf&rsquos son, joined the company early on (photo 34) .


34 James Wendell Eads

Here is a short summary of James&rsquo autobiography as written by himself for the Centennial Celebration of the Iberia Academy and Junior College October 13, 1990:

1991 is my 50th year of managing Eads Motor Company. I began working full time after getting married to Betty Hoops in 1941. My father acquired the Ford Dealership in 1913, and the business has the distinction of being the oldest family owned dealership in the state of Missouri. I am also associated with the Bank of Crocker, and raise cattle for a hobby. We have two daughters: Judy Eads Elliott teaches Spanish and coordinates Mexican Studies at the University of Missouri. Her husband, Dr. James Elliott has a Dental Practice in Columbia. Their daughter, Courtney, is in the School of Medicine at M.U. and son David is studying Marine Biology at Eckerd College in Florida. Our other daughter, Karen Eads Atwill and husband Dan, an attorney with the law firm of Knight, Ford, Wright, Atwill, Parshall, also live in Columbia. Their children are: Dana, a freshman at M.U. Kirsten, an 11th grader, and Daniel who is in the 7th grade.

James was interviewed several years ago by Ginnie Duffield of the Vernon Publishing Company. In this article, Jim gives some personal insight about the company and some of his memories of the early years:

Gift of Model A Takes Jim Eads Back In time To 1913 Founding of Iberia Ford Dealership

Story and Photos by Ginnie Duffield

December 30, 1999, Miller County Autogram Sentinel

Jim Eads of Iberia finally has a car just like Dad used to have. It was a Christmas gift from a daughter and son-in-law. Eads &ldquonew&rdquo car is a cream colored Model A, complete with a rumble seat. The car has been on display at Eads Motor Company in Iberia, causing motorists passing on Highway 42 to turn their heads. Eads also has driven it around town some. For the holidays, Santa and Mrs. Claus have been riding in the rumble seat (photo 35) .


35 Jim Eads in Model A Car

Eads Motor Company is a Ford dealership with more than 85 years of history. &ldquoDad (J. A. Eads) got the Ford agency in 1913,&rdquo Eads said. &ldquoHe was doing something else when he decided to go into the car business,&rdquo according to Eads. The Eads family had a telephone company serving the south part of the county. It was run with a six party line switchboard, meaning each customer shared their phone line with five other customers. The switch board was small. &ldquoIt looked just like a wall telephone,&rdquo Eads said.

One picture the family has is of the elder Eads standing up on the cross arm of a telephone pole (see photo 12) . Already sure that telephone communication was important to the modern world, the elder Eads decided the automobile was a sure thing too.

&ldquoI arrived January 18, 1922,&rdquo Eads said while standing in the waiting room of his dealership. Pointing to the floor, he added, &ldquoRight about here was where I was born.&rdquo That&rsquos because he was born at home, as nearly everyone was in the early part of the century. The family home then was next to the dealership and had to be torn down when the building was enlarged in 1949.

&ldquoI&rsquove been working ever since,&rdquo Eads said. &ldquoI worked before I got married. That was at age 19.&rdquo

His wife&rsquos name is Betty Sue. They have two daughters, Judy Elliott and Karen Atwill. Both live in Columbia.

Eads said at one point, Ford started sending cars to dealerships, whether they wanted them or not. The over supply became so severe that his father was renting barns to store them in.

Eads was at the garage most of the time as a youngster. One thing he liked to do was grab a car as it was being driven through the garage area and let it pull him along.

&ldquoA guy ran over me when I was 4 years old, back here in the shop,&rdquo he said. A customer ran to him and lifted the car so he could get out from under the wheel.

That wasn&rsquot the only close call Eads has had involving the family businesses. His parents also had an oil distributorship, and the building was located on St. Louis Street, just down the hill from where Iberia City Hall is now located. One day in April 1939 the younger Eads was unloading the business bulk truck at Lev Adams Produce. A couple of teenage boys were walking down the street and just as they got to the gasoline truck, one reached over and struck a match on the filler pip in order to light a cigarette. He lit more than that. Fumes from the gasoline caught fire. Despite efforts by Eads and others to douse the blaze, it spread. Before evening fell, two blocks of Iberia had been leveled, including the Bank of Iberia.

After more than 55 years with the Shell Oil Company Eads sold the oil distributorship some years back and concentrated on his car business (photo 36) .

He also used to sell Ford farm machinery. &ldquoI&rsquove sold them (Ford tractors) all over the country,&rdquo Eads said. &ldquoI got a carload of them in 1952.&rdquo He wishes he had those 8N Ford tractors back. In 1952 they sold new for $1,550. Now the small tractors, popular with hobby farmers and restorers, sell for about $3,000 (photos 37 and 38) .


37 David Vineyard (Left) - Jim Eads (Center) - Alfred Vineyard (Right)


38 Jim Eads, David Vineyard and Alfred Vineyard

He&rsquos not sure of the future of the dealership when he finally retires. But he knows area residents need somewhere to get service work done on their Fords.

The Model A gift was supposed to be a surprise for Eads from James and Judy (Eads) Elliott. They had purchased it restored and brought it to Iberia from their home in Columbia. &ldquoThey brought it to church,&rdquo fellow Iberia Baptist Church member Larry Martin said. But Eads had not felt well that day and had not stayed at church, so they stashed it under Eads&rsquo brother in law Sherrill Woolery&rsquos carport. Then Eads showed up and the surprise was over. Eads took a spin in it. The ancient engine backfired. &ldquoThey heard it two blocks away, &ldquohe grinned. The old car brings back memories to nearly everyone in Eads&rsquo generation. Many have climbed up in the car to relive their experiences. Eads has lots of memories surrounding Model A&rsquos too.

&ldquoI rode in a Model A when they were building Bagnell Dam,&rdquo Eads said. He and his father and his father would drive to the dam site from time to time, which was an arduous journey. He remembers that the first Missouri State Highway Patrol troopers drove Model A runabouts. Woolery, who Martin said could fix anything, said even though Henry Ford, developer of the Ford car, said one could buy a Model T in any color as long as it was black, the Model A came in several colors, including the cream color.

Even though Eads followed his father into the auto and oil businesses, and farmed too, one love of his father&rsquos he never learned to even like was flying. From 1932 until about 1963, Eads&rsquo dad had a plane and had a grass landing strip constructed on the family farm west of Iberia on&hellipappropriately enough&hellipAirport Road. But the younger Eads never got over being airsick. He said on trips to St. Louis with his dad he would be sick both going and coming back. Learning to fly a plane was never something he wanted to do.

J.A. Eads used to fly over to Lake of the Ozarks, too, as there was a small airfield near the dam. The airstrip remained open to the flying public for many years, even after the elder Eads quit flying. But because of the need to keep it up and liability issues, it has been taken off air maps.

Jim Eads enjoys being at his dealership daily. A group gathers nearly every noon hour to visit, talking about but never quite solving world problems (photos 39 and 40) .


39 Jim Eads and Louis Martin


40 American Legion Hall

Eads said his favorite topic right now is getting mail delivered in a more timely fashion to Iberia. He said mail from other communities had gotten so slow, he has quit taking a daily paper. He was one of many Iberians who met several years ago with Congressman Ike Skelton in an attempt to get things straightened out. Not much changed.

Iberia and St. Anthony are the only communities in Miller County served out of the Springfield mail facility. The others are served out of the Columbia mail facility. Eads would like to see Iberia and St. Anthony, which is a rural route from Iberia, switched to Columbia.

While Eads admits he is slowing down, retirement is not something he looks forward to or even is planning. &ldquoMy hobby is working,&rsquo he said.

Henry Ford Eads, the other son of Alf&rsquos, was a WW II hero. He was a Shell Oil Company executive who spent most of his adult life in Texas (photo 41) .


41 Henry Ford and Polly Eads

His story only recently was made public when he was interviewed by a reporter for his local paper, the Cleburne Times Review of Cleburne, Texas on January 23, 2005.

Morgan Pope, a nephew of Henry&rsquos, tells us something about him:

The article in the Cleburne paper is a good synopsis of Uncle Ford's time in the Navy during WWII. I told you in an earlier e-mail how I had bugged him to write about his experiences, but for years he would tell me a bit, then say, "Oh, it wasn't very exciting most of the time." We just went back and forth across the Pacific taking soldiers back and forth. Bit by bit I learned a little more, but wasn't getting the whole story. Then, a few years ago Connie and I visited with him in Cleburne, TX and then we went together to Marble Falls, TX to visit my cousin Bert Pope (Lee Pope's son) and his wife Jo Anna. While there we conspired to take Uncle Ford to the Admiral Nimitz museum in Fredericksburg, TX. Uncle Ford talked about having met Admiral Nimitz and how his brother-in-law (I believe it was) was an aide to Nimitz. He was pretty quiet, but very interested. Then we rounded a corner in the museum and there was a photo of a downed Japanese plane on a beach. He said instantly, "There was a Jap sniper in that plane!" and then he began to talk. People gathered around him as he told us about it and a man nearby came up and said, "Mister, may I shake your hand." It was a touching moment, people were so interested and he loved the attention. Shortly after we returned home I got a synopsis of his time in the military. It began something like this. "My nephew Morgan Pope has been bugging me for years to write something about my experiences during WWII and in order to shut him up . " Not long afterwards the article in the Cleburne Times came our way. So I learned about the Italian assault and also that on the way back to the east coast they brought a load of German prisoners from the African campaign.

Thanks Morgan. At this point I will copy the article about Henry&rsquos Naval experiences in WWII as printed in the Cleburne Times Review:

Living Up To A Good Name: Henry Ford Eads


42 Lt. Henry Ford Eads

By Larue Barnes
Cleburne Times Review January 23, 2005

Navy Lt. Henry Ford Eads, now of Cleburne, witnessed one of the most horrifying sights of World War II. Airplanes were being shot down, plummeting on fire all around him. The sky was filled with paratroopers, many plunging to their deaths. &ldquoFriendly fire.&rdquo The airplanes and troops were our own.

&ldquoWe had left Oran, Algeria, aboard our ship, the USS Neville, in a convoy,&rdquo Eads said (photo 43) .

&ldquoWe joined French and British ships to make an assault landing on the beaches of Gela, Sicily. It was on July 10, 1943, very early in the morning, very dark. The sea was rough.

As we boarded our LCVPs to make the first wave landing, a German plane flew over us and dropped two bombs that did no damage. About this same time, our paratroopers were flying low overhead, preparing to jump behind the enemy lines. Many of our ships mistook them for enemy planes and opened fire, shooting down several. They crash landed on fire into the ocean. What a horrible mistake! We were killing our own men!&rdquo

&ldquoI had a ringside seat to all of this because I was assigned to take the first assault wave in to the beach. About halfway to the beach a large spotlight turned on us, and I thought, &lsquoWell, this didn&rsquot last long. Like shooting fish in a barrel.&rsquo I immediately called for fire support on my radio, and thank God it came. Still dark, we saw three red hot shells from a cruiser arch over us to the light. They made a &lsquobulls eye!&rsquo No more light. We landed with very little resistance it was the first amphibious landing on the European continent in World War II.&rdquo

Records reveal that 23 American transport planes were shot down and 37 others were damaged by our own gunners during that battle.

After heavy fighting July 10, 1943, General Patton decided to reinforce his troops with more than 2,000 additional paratroopers from his reserves in North Africa. He ordered that the men be dropped near Gela, Sicily. German aircraft was active over the American sector all day, and senior Army and Navy officers went to great lengths to inform everyone of the impending night time paratroop drop.

But when the transport planes arrived over the beaches in the wake of the German air raid, nervous antiaircraft gunners ashore and afloat opened fire with a devastating effect. Later, investigation revealed that not everyone had been informed that the drop would take place.

&ldquoIt was never in the news,&rdquo Eads said.

After two days of unloading weapons, food, men and other supplied, Eads said they took aboard some of the surviving angry paratroopers.

&ldquoWe unloaded the casualties in Oran, Algeria, and took aboard several hundred prisoners from Rommel&rsquos Africa Corps,&rdquo he said.

&ldquoAt first, the prisoners were afraid their submarines would sink us, but as time passed and we continued west, they began to realize we were heading for the USA and their war days were over. They relaxed, and in the evenings they sang special songs for us they were good. We unloaded the prisoners onto a waiting train in Norfolk, Virginia.&rdquo

Eads called home and found that he had a new baby son. &ldquoI told the executive officer I knew I hadn&rsquot earned a leave so early but if he would grant me a short leave to go see my son, Michael, I would make him a better officer,&rdquo he said. &ldquoThankfully, he let me go.&rdquo

On his way home, chances are Eads thought of all that had happened to him within a short period of time.

Eads was employed by Shell Oil Company in Kilgore before he joined the Navy. He was moved to Houston by Shell, and a friend promised to keep up with his draft status back in Kilgore.

&ldquoEventually, he told me that all eligible single men had been drafted and that married men with children were being called,&rdquo Eads said. &ldquoSince Polly and I already had a 2 year old son and she was pregnant again, I enrolled in the Navy&rsquos V-7 program exactly one year after Pearl Harbor.&rdquo

&ldquoI was told that it would probably be six months before I would be called, but in less than a month I was called to report to Notre Dame University to enter the Navy&rsquos V7 program for officer&rsquos training school.&rdquo

The young family had to move quickly. Eads took his wife and child to Bagnell, Missouri, where they could live with her mother while he was gone.

&ldquoMy mother&rsquos home was just below the Bagnell Dam,&rdquo Mrs. Eads explained.

&ldquoEarly that spring, heavy rains caused the dam&rsquos water level to rise quickly. They opened the flood gates without letting us know. My brothers, Walter and Vernon Pope, knew about it, and they came to get us out before the little town was completely washed away. I remember that mother and I put the baby things on the bed upstairs, thinking they would be dry. We couldn&rsquot drive out. One of my brothers took the car up in the mountains.&rdquo

&ldquoI&rsquoll never forget. I was seven months pregnant and we had to walk a long distance on the railroad tracks to escape. When the house was checked later, there was nothing but mud there. The entire town was gone. Ford was at Notre Dame, not knowing a thing about it.&rdquo

The family moved to Eldon, Missouri to higher ground. All their personal possessions were lost.

Eads was thankful they had another healthy boy. It was difficult to say goodbye, especially now that he knew the horrors of war (photo 44) .


44 Lt. Henry Ford Eads on Leave

Returning to his ship, he eventually found himself in the Pacific Theater of the war.

On November 20, 1943, Eads took the third assault wave in to Makin in the Gilbert Islands. The Japanese were successfully driven off the island. Eads received the Bronze Star and a commendation letter from Admiral Nimitz.

On January 31, 1944, he took the fifth assault wave in to Kwajalein Island and later landed on Eniwetok. There was moderate opposition. On May 30, 1944, he left for Saipan, Tinian and Guam.

The Neville crossed the equator October 26, 1944, and continued on to Leyte Gulf in the Philippines on November 18, 1944 (photo 45) .

&ldquoWe were under attack from the air at Leyte Gulf but suffered no casualties,&rdquo Eads said. &ldquoWe were given credit for two planes shot down. But during March and April 1945, we moved to Ulithi Atoll where we witnessed the greatest concentration of Navy power ever seen&hellipbattleships, cruisers, aircraft carriers, assault ships and utility ships.&rdquo

By now, Eads was promoted to communication officer aboard the USS Neville (APA-9), and in May 1945, he was transferred to the US Gilliam (APA-57) as communication officer.

He and Polly used a code in their correspondence she said. He gave her a list of dogs and placed by each the country or location they represented in his code. When he wrote of a certain dog in his letter, she went to her list and found where he was.

On August 6, 1945, the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan. Eads was en route to San Francisco when they received a radio message of the event.

&ldquoOur radio men thought a mistake had been made about the power of the bomb until they double checked and found it to be true,&rdquo he said.

From Portland, Oregon to Houston was a long ride. But Henry Ford Eads was coming home. After his final discharge from the Navy, he caught a train for Kansas City.

&ldquoIt was Christmas Eve 1945,&rdquo he said. &ldquoThe weather was very bad up there. Traffic had stopped. I was determined to get to my family for Christmas. I took a cab to the city limits and hitchhiked towards Eldon. After two rides, I just couldn&rsquot get any further. I called Polly in Eldon and her brother, Vernon, came to Tipton in his 1935 Packard to pick me up. I got to my family at dusk on Christmas Eve. What a joyful reunion and Christmas! I was so grateful that God had watched over me!&rdquo

Eads said his name is easily remembered by others. When he was born in Iberia, Missouri on December 27, 1915, to J.A. and Lou Bond Eads, he was to become the middle child of seven. His father agreed on the name for his first son after the local newspaper editor suggested,&rdquo Since you are the local Ford dealer, that would be a great name.&rdquo

His father&rsquos Ford dealership in Iberia would survive for 88 years, just recently closed by Ford&rsquos brother, Jim. Although J.A. Eads didn&rsquot complete the fourth grade, he was brilliant in his business ventures.

&ldquoMy dad was also a Shell oil jobber,&rdquo Ford Eads said.&rdquo Before that, he had run a grist mill and also built telephone lines. He was the one in the area with the first car, radio, television&hellip everything. He became a ham radio operator and learned to fly after he had bought an airplane. A pilot who needed work and a place to live came and stayed with us while he was teaching us to fly. The pilot let me fly, but my dad would never let me solo since I was just a teenager at the time.

&ldquoEventually, my dad bought his second plane and made a landing strip out on a farm that we owned. He was a very quiet man, but so very strong in many ways.&rdquo

Because Ford&rsquos father was well known in surrounding communities when he put telephone lines in, Pauline &ldquoPolly&rdquo Pope was allowed to date Eads when a mutual friend suggested a blind date. Otherwise, her father would not have let her go. They dated from 1935 to 1937, when they married in Galveston on their way to live in Houston.

&ldquoI was so excited to get a job with Shell,&rdquo Eads said. &ldquoWhen I graduated from the University of Missouri in 1937, you more or less had to wait until somebody died to get a good job. I had considered studying medicine at one time since I had four years of Latin, two years of Greek and two years of German in High school and junior college. But I had no encouragement. So I thought business would be safe choice in case I had to return and work for my father in his Ford dealership.&rdquo

But he never left Shell Oil Company. Eads retired as eastern region tax manager for Shell in 1976, after almost 40 years of service. He and Polly moved to Cleburne immediately to be near their son Bob, who was employed here at the time.

They joined First Baptist Church in Cleburne and have remained active members ever since. Eads had also served as secretary of the Cleburne Kiwanis Club. Their son Bob, and his wife, Rosalynn, now live in Hurst. Michael, their younger son, lives in Fort Smith, Arkansas.

The Eads&rsquo are world travelers. Ford told of a time in New Zealand when his name opened doors for them.

&ldquoPolly and I were with a tour group, waiting in front of our hotel,&rdquo he said. &ldquoWe noticed 15 or so Model A Fords along a circular drive of the hotel, and we thought that was unusual. There was a group of men there, so I sort of sidled up to them and asked what kind of group they were. They told me they were Ford dealers from Canada. Each had won a trip to New Zealand. I told them my dad had been a Ford dealer in Iberia, Missouri and that my younger brother was still running the agency. We introduced ourselves. They didn&rsquot believe that my name was Henry Ford until I showed them identification. We enjoyed talking with them. Later, an envelope was pushed underneath our door there in the hotel. It was an invitation from the president of the Ford Motor Company of Canada, inviting us to be their special guests that evening at a cocktail party, dinner and show. We started scrambling around, finding the best clothes we had. When we walked in, we were treated like royalty. It was an absolutely wonderful experience. When we got home, I got my brother, Jim, to give me some of the Ford dealership stationery so that we could write a thank you letter on it.&rdquo

Henry Ford Eads will be 90 this year. He and Polly will celebrate 68 years of marriage. He attributes his long, healthy life to eating properly, getting plenty of sleep and exercising regularly.

&ldquoI know I need to keep my strength in my legs and keep my back moving or I&rsquom down,&rdquo he added. &ldquoI think the main thing I have going form me is the good Lord. He has been so good to both of us.&rdquo

I thought about the brand new naval officer as he led the first amphibious landing on the European continent in World War II. As enemy spotlights illuminated him, he quickly radioed for help. From a cruiser somewhere came three shells. They hit their target and blessed darkness covered him again. That was the closest call he had during the war.

&ldquoA lot of people at home were praying for me,&rdquo Eads said emotionally. &ldquoI know, without a doubt, that&rsquos how I got home.&rdquo

Morgan has some more information to add about the big &rsquo43 flood when he and his family along with his Aunt Pauline and her child Bob barely escaped the rising Osage River waters as well as more about his Uncle Henry Ford Eads:

So what do I remember about those times? I remember my Aunt Pauline and son Bob lived with Grandmother Pope in Bagnell. I remember walking out of Bagnell with Mom and Dad, Aunt Pauline, Bob and Grandmother Pope in 1943 along the Missouri-Pacific Railroad tracks and over the trestle over Wright Creek at Hiway 54 with the water sloshing up under the ties.

Later Grandmother Pope, Aunt Pauline, Bob and later Mike lived in Eldon, Missouri just across from where the High School complex is now after the flood. I remember when cousin Mike was born. Occasionally Uncle Ford sent "souvenirs" back from the war zone. One of those objects was a small suitcase which contained a small shrine (I guess) which had a photo of the soldier's wife, some cigarettes, made with straw as I recall, a letter or postcard in Japanese and some Shinto objects. Intriguing to me. I remember he was a handsome man in his dress whites. His sisters-in-law liked posing with him for photos.

As an Uncle he was interested in what I was doing and later in Connie and Clark and Sean. He was very bright and involved with his work as a tax manager for Shell Oil Company. He was a loyal employee and very proud of his name. He told us many stories of the doors his name opened. I always considered him and Aunt Pauline my aunt and uncle who had traveled the world and were pretty sophisticated.

He loved to argue and would often take the opposite side just to create an argument. He was passionate about his opinions and we had some great arguments. No one ever gave in.

Sorry this is disjointed, but it was a long time ago.

Recently, Governor Nixon signed into law HB 427 giving veterans a number of privileges and rights. You can read the entire bill at this URL:

One of the provisions was directed to those veterans who had received a Purple Heart award related to injuries suffered in combat. In the bill it reads as follows:

&ldquoAuthorizes the Department of Revenue to provide one set of &ldquoPurple Heart&rdquo specialized license plates free of charge to any person who has been awarded the medal. Any additional set of special license plates may be obtained at the current fee for specialized plates.&rdquo

Former Miller County resident Max Pryor, who is my cousin, was one of the witnesses testifying before The Committee On Veterans in favor of the bill. The bill had been introduced by Max&rsquos Representative, Timothy W. Jones of district 89 near St. Louis. Max had sought out Representative Jones to bring the idea of the Purple Heart changes to his attention. After the bill was signed by the governor, Max received this email message from Representative Jones&rsquo secretary:

Sent: Tuesday, July 14, 2009 12:00 PM
Subject: RE: HB427

Max,

It is wonderful news. I am glad he is supporting our veterans, and we couldn't have done it without YOU! Have a great week.

Jody Williams
Legislative Assistant to
Representative Timothy W. Jones
District 89

Max received three purple hearts for wounds suffered in Vietnam as well as a Bronze Star. Here is a photo of him and his wife Carolyn (Patterson) taken in 1967 while he was on active duty (photo 46) :


46 Carolyn and Max - 1967

You can read one of Max&rsquos letters to his father, Fred Pryor, while he was in Vietnam at this URL on our website:


Oregon obituaries

Clark Gallagher, former general manager of the Democrat-Herald, past president of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and publisher of newspapers in Springfield, Newport and Hillsboro, died New Year&rsquos Day after an accident at his home in Bend. He was 71.

Friends and former coworkers praised Gallagher as a &ldquomentor,&rdquo someone who &ldquoalways had a smile on his face,&rdquo and a person with &ldquoa heart for his community.&rdquo

Albany businessman Mark Thomas had been friends with Gallagher since the early 1970s, &ldquowhen we both had long hair and he looked like Jesus.&rdquo

Thomas' family owned a foreign car dealership in Bend and Gallagher was an advertising representative for the Bulletin newspaper.

&ldquoI was in college and he worked with my dad at first and then with me when I went to work for the company&rdquo Thomas said. &ldquoHe was a helluva newspaperman and was involved in everything in the community. He saw every facet of newspapering.&rdquo

Thomas called his friend a &ldquotruly good person&rdquo who was always upbeat and &ldquoa lot of fun.&rdquo

Former Democrat-Herald publisher John Buchner worked with Gallagher for many years and called him an outstanding newspaperman, family man and community member.

&ldquoClark was a key sales executive for the Democrat-Herald and its sister publications,&rdquo he said. &ldquoI&rsquom grateful for his expertise and dedication while I was general manager and publisher. He first worked for me as a retail advertising manager and after serving as publisher of the Springfield News, I brought him back to Albany as general manager in charge of all sales.&rdquo

Gallagher was later promoted to publisher of the Newport News-Times, another Democrat-Herald sister publication at that time.

&ldquoHe was good with people and truly believed that the newspaper was a partner with local businesses in promotions and sales,&rdquo Buchner said. &ldquoHe also was a leader within the Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce. And on top of everything else, he was a great husband and father to his family.&rdquo

Buchner praised Gallagher as, &ldquothe kind of individual a company highly values in the workforce. He will be missed.&rdquo

Gallagher retired from the Hillsboro Argus &mdash a sister publication to the Portland Oregonian &mdash at the end of 2011.

He and his wife, Kimberly, a retired schoolteacher, moved from Albany to Bend in 2015.

Under Gallagher&rsquos leadership, the Argus was an award-winning newspaper, and in 2009 it earned the prestigious General Excellence award for its circulation category in the annual Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association Better Newspaper Contest.

&ldquoI am terribly sad to hear about the loss of Clark. He was a great newspaperman,&rdquo said ONPA executive director Laurie Hieb. &ldquoClark engaged himself in the community his newspaper served and was very well-liked. He was the president of ONPA when I was hired as executive director. Clark was a huge supporter of mine as well as the association. I will never forget all of the encouragement and guidance he gave me during that time. He will be greatly missed.&rdquo

Gallagher spent more than 40 years in the newspaper business, including stints as the advertising supervisor of The Bulletin in Bend advertising director and then general manager of the Democrat-Herald editor and publisher of the Springfield News and Newport News-Times, and publisher of the Hillsboro Argus.

Gallagher was actively involved in every community, and a lifelong Rotarian.

He was a past chairman of the board of the Albany Area Chamber of Commerce and was honored as an Albany First Citizen.

&ldquoDuring the late '90s Clark was a board member and served as chairman in 1997-&lsquo98&rdquo said Janet Steele, president of the Albany Area Chamber of Commerce. &ldquoDuring his tenure, the chamber developed our first strategic long-term plan and did a complete remodel of the office. He was a people person and well respected in the community. I've been privileged to work with 30 different board chairs over the years and Clark was one of the best.&rdquo

He was also active with the Yaquina Bay Economic Development Foundation and the United Way of Linn County.

&ldquoClark was a very positive guy. There was always a great vibe of goodwill and constructive energy coming off him. It sounds like a cliché&rsquo, but he really did always have a smile on his face, or most of the time anyway,&rdquo said Steve Lundeberg, who worked with Gallagher at the Springfield and Albany newspapers. &ldquoClark was very approachable, very human. He made me feel at home when I was hired as sports editor of the Springfield News when I was basically just a kid.&rdquo

Lundeberg, now a writer at Oregon State, said Gallagher, &ldquo&hellip had a fun-loving nature and a presence that exuded leadership. I really liked him the last great age of newspapering has lost another of its bright lights.&rdquo

Oweta Smith worked in the Democrat-Herald&rsquos advertising department for more than 20 years.

&ldquoWhen I think of Clark, I think of what a wonderful, nice man, so generous with his talents, a mentor to myself and many of the advertising people on the staff,&rdquo she said. &ldquoI really enjoyed working with him. He was even-tempered, approachable, and a hands-on leader. He saw himself as a mentor and not someone who just ordered people around.&rdquo

Gallagher is survived by Kimberly, his wife of 44 years, a son, Matthew Brett Gallagher and his wife, Alysia, of Ogden, Utah and a daughter, Tiffany Suzanne LeClair and her husband Eric, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. His first grandchild is due in May.

Arrangements are by Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, Bend, at www.niswonger-reynolds.com/.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 SE 27th St., Bend, OR 97702 or at www.hsco.org.

Private family services at the Oregon coast are planned.

Molly R. Walker

Molly Rebecca Walker of Salem, beloved wife of James Rockwell Walker, lost her life to mental illness on March 30, 2015. Molly was born in Gold Beach on October 31, 1958 to Robert and Betty Templeman Van Leer, and attended local public schools, graduating from Gold Beach High in 1976.

Molly briefly attended Southwestern Oregon Community College in Coos Bay, then joined her family at the Curry County Reporter where she continued to work as an owner and editor until 2008. Most recently Molly worked for the Yamhill News-Register from 2008 to 2014 where she wrote features, business columns and covered religious topics in the local community until the end of October 2014 when she took a hiatus from work to assist Jim with his Rotary preparation for becoming District Governor in 2015-16.

Molly and Jim were married in 1983, blending four boys into a family unit including Dale, Jim, Rob and Chris. Theirs was a very happy marriage as the two joined their souls and began their journey through life. They were almost inseparable, and enjoyed life's little pleasures, like spending time with family and friends.

Molly's upbringing led her to have a passion for gardening and the outdoors although she will be remembered by most for her passion and dedication to community journalism. She dedicated herself to providing a medium to her communities for gathering local information as well as being a supporter of local causes. Her tireless efforts and practical advice were never un-noticed by those around her as she assisted breaking down the gender barrier in Rotary by joining the organization in 1988 and was recognized as the Gold Beach Citizen of the Year in 1995. She also served as the Gold Beach Rotary club president in 1997-98 and helped in making Rotary a family legacy by including husband Jim on many of her initiatives and helping him become a leader in District 5110.

Molly and Jim enjoyed most of their hobbies together, which included sports car racing, hiking local trails and roads, attending family sporting events, spoiling their grandkids and visiting family. They also enjoyed traveling having visited much of the United States, Canada, the Cooke Islands, Africa, Europe and Australia. While traveling Molly, being the big hugger type, often sidestepped the offered handshake for a warm embrace and enjoyed exploring new cultures and making new friends.

She is missed terribly by her husband two sons and families: Rob and Becca of Toronto, Canada, Chris and Emily of Medford two stepsons: Dale Walker of South Beach, and Jim and Kathi Walker of Salem her sisters: Sherry and Scott Wills of Portland, Amy and Doug Bornemeier of Milwaukee, and Sally and Dave Shuey of Portland plus her seven grandchildren: Alex and Greyson Walker (parents: Jim and Kathi), Travis, Caleb and Olivia (Chris and Emily), and Sadie and Charlie (Rob and Becca).

Molly is also survived by nieces and nephews Jordan and Maya Shuey and Jon and Anna Bornemeier.

Everyone who met Molly loved her for her genuine interest in them and her infectious smile and bubbly personality. She loved her community, her family and sharing almost 32 years with husband Jim, her children, grandchildren and sisters and families.

Rest in peace, my wonderful, beautiful wife and best friend, Molly. You'll live forever in our hearts.

Cremation services were provided by Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service of Salem, and a memorial service is scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, April 11 at Bethany Lutheran Church in Gold Beach.

Published in Statesman-Journal on April 5, 2015.

Bob Caldwell

Robert J. Caldwell, editorial page editor of The Oregonian since November 1995, died March 10, 2012 of a heart attack. He was 63.

Caldwell &mdash simply "Bob" to everyone at The Oregonian &mdash was known all over the building for his big smile and a bigger laugh. But those close to him also knew him to have a keen mind, excellent news judgment, and a heart full of compassion.

Bob grew up in the northeastern Oregon town of La Grande, where he excelled in both the classroom and in athletics at La Grande High School.

It was also while in high school that Caldwell started an interest in journalism and began writing sports stories for the La Grande Observer.

After high school, Caldwell enrolled at what is now Eastern Oregon University in La Grande. He spent two years there, then transferred to the University of Oregon where he majored in journalism and graduated in 1972.

After graduation from the UO, he worked as a reporter, editor and publisher at several newspapers in the Northwest. While he spent most of his life in Oregon, Caldwell served briefly as the managing editor of the Valley Newspapers in Kent, Wash., in 1979, but returned to Oregon as editor of the Springfield News.

After that, he was publisher of The Outlook in Gresham and then came to The Oregonian as a copy editor in 1983. From there, he became regional editor, then advanced to the position of Metro editor, directing the paper's assistant metro editors, suburban editors and reporting staff. He held that job for eight years before being named the paper's first public editor in 1993.

Two years later, Bob was named editorial page editor, where he also directed the newspaper's daily commentary pages and Sunday Opinion section.

"Bob Caldwell was an outstanding journalist and editor who cared deeply about Oregon and Oregonians," said N. Christian Anderson III, president and publisher of The Oregonian. "His leadership of our editorial pages fostered growing conversation among readers of The Oregonian and users of OregonLive.com."

"He was thoughtful and considerate of his colleagues and their views. And having worked with Bob nearly 40 years ago in our first jobs out of college, I was enjoying our reunion at The Oregonian."

"He will be missed by so many people. We share this sadness with Lora, his family and his friends."

Under Caldwell's direction, The Oregonian won a Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing in 2006 for editorials by Doug Bates and Rick Attig about the abuses inside "a forgotten Oregon mental hospital."

Caldwell was active in professional organizations and is a past president of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association, the Oregon Newspaper Foundation and the Western Oregon chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2009, ONPA presented him with the Amos Voorhies award, which honors outstanding journalistic achievement in the public interest. He was also a member of the Oregon Press-Bar-Bench-Broadcasters Committee.

In 1993, he served as editor-in-residence for two new daily newspapers in Romania,Cotidianul in Bucharest and Monitorul de Iasi in Iasi. He has been a consultant to other publications in the Balkans as well.

Caldwell is survived by his wife, Lora Cuykendall daughters Beth, Kate and Ellie Caldwell his mother, Barbara of La Grande and brothers Mike and Kevin of Salem, Pete of La Grande, and Pat of Fruitland, Idaho. His father Donald J. Caldwell died in 1986.

From an Oregonian article by John Killen.

Dick Nafsinger

Richard A. "Dick" Nafsinger passed away Saturday, July 23, 2011, from complications of pulmonary fibrosis. He was at home, surrounded by family members. He was 77.

Dick was born Dec. 6, 1933, in Nampa, Idaho, the youngest of 4 children of Harry O. and Grace Nafsinger.

Dick's dad died when Dick was a youngster and he grew up quickly, helping his older brothers tend to the family farm. He was drawn to journalism at Caldwell High School, where he was sports editor of the student newspaper, the Canyon Cougar. He was also custodian of the Ida White Chapter of Quill and Scroll, an international honor society for journalism students.

Dick started dating Phyllis Myers during their senior year at Caldwell High. They graduated together in 1952, married in 1953, and celebrated 60 years together "as a couple" early in 2011.

Dick attended College of Idaho and while there was drawn to radio. He served as a disc jockey for station KCID and also did play-by-play at sporting events.

He began his professional newspaper career in 1957 when he was hired as sports editor of the Albany Democrat-Herald. His professional demeanor quickly gained him respect among the coaches and teams he covered, and the newspaper appointed him managing editor a short time later.

In 1962, at age 28, Dick was hired as editor and publisher of the Hood River News.For the next 29 years, Dick built the News into a nationally recognized newspaper and parlayed his own career into national prominence, as well.

Dick was selected as president of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association in 1972, and in 1986-87 he served as president of the National Newspaper Association. He was also a past chairman of American Newspaper Representatives.

Dick was president and chief operating officer of Eagle Newspapers Inc. (ENI) from 1978 until his retirement in 2001, and he remained on the board of directors until his death. ENI is a family-owned corporation that operates 26 publishing, printing and related businesses in Oregon, Washington and Idaho.

In 1986, Dick received the ONPA Amos E. Voorhies Award, which honors outstanding journalistic achievement in the public interest, service in the interest of the welfare and honor of the journalistic profession or long, useful and honorable careers in the field of journalism.

Dick received the ONPA's president's award in 1996, was voted an honorary life member in 2001, and was inducted into the Oregon Newspaper Hall of Fame in 2002.

Last fall, Dick was the recipient of the National Newspaper Association's highest award for distinguished service and leadership to the community press and their community, the James O. Amos Award. He remained active in national newspaper affairs long after he retired as News publisher, and often was sought out by his peers for advice on journalism issues.

Dick was preceded in death by brothers Bill and Jim and sister Eleanor. Survivors include Phyllis and their children: Janie Nafsinger and her husband, Jim Clark, of Portland Nancy Clarke and her husband, Keith Clarke, of Hood River John Nafsinger, of Santa Monica, Calif. and Pam Nafsinger and her husband, Michael Bernas, of Portland. Other survivors are grandchildren Angela Wallis, Greg Clarke, Alexander Walentin and Lydia Sandys-Winsch.

Pat Zimmerman

Patricia Scott Zimmerman of Bend, wife of 1977 ONPA president Leroy Zimmerman, passed away Dec. 31, 2010, from complications of Parkinson's disease.

She was born in Eugene, Oregon, June 16, 1931, to Vuelta and Damon Scott. She graduated from Cottage Grove High School in 1949, and attended Washington State University.

Pat owned The 88-Cent Store and later operated Perry's Variety, both in Cottage Grove, Oregon, where her husband, Leroy (Zimm) Zimmerman, was publisher of theCottage Grove Sentinel. From 1983 to 2005, Pat and Zimm owned and operated Zimm's Hallmark, first in the Mountain View Mall and later in the Bend River Mall.

While in Cottage Grove, Pat was active in community and civic activities, and involved in her daughters' activities, often sewing for their projects. While Zimm was publisher of the Cottage Grove Sentinel, she developed special friendships with people in the newspaper business. Pat loved the Oregon coast and for 40 years enjoyed getaways to their beach cabin near Waldport. She was also a member of Trinity Lutheran Church in Cottage Grove and Trinity Lutheran in Bend.

Survivors include Leroy (Zimm), her husband of 45 years, and four daughters, Berta Flora, Appleton, WI Nancy Shoptaw (Ray), Eugene Karen Soine (Mark), Everett, WA Marsha New (Willis), Roseburg as well as eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her brother, Malcolm (Jackie) Scott, and family, Eugene, OR.

Pat's family would like to express gratitude to long-time friend and caregiver, Tami Neil, Drs. Richard Kohler and Paul Johnson, Partners In Care Hospice House, and Pastors Robert Luinstra and David Carnahan.

A homegoing service for Pat will be at 2:00 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 8, at Trinity Lutheran Church, 2550 NE Butler Market Road, Bend. Private interment will be held later. Remembrances in honor of Pat may be made to Trinity Lutheran Church, Bend.

Joe Blaha

Joseph W. Blaha, longtime Oregon newspaper publisher and past president of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association, died Wednesday, March 25, 2009, at his Oregon City home following a long illness. He was 70.

Mr. Blaha was born Sept. 17, 1938, in Omaha, Neb., to Joseph Mathew Blaha and Margaret Taney Blaha. The family moved to San Francisco, where he spent most of his formative years. He was a graduate of Mont La Salle Academy in Napa, Calif., and St. Mary's College in Moraga, Calif. He attended graduate school at San Francisco State, where he studied under S.I. Hayakawa.

Early in his newspaper career he worked for the San Francisco Examiner in circulation and then advertising. In 1966 he came to theItemizer-Observer in Dallas, Ore., where he became publisher. He moved to the Daily Journal in Ukiah, Calif., converting the publication to offset press in a new building. He then returned to Dallas in 1971, helping to establish Eagle Newspapers' new central printing plant in Salem and to assist with newspaper acquisitions. In 1978, when Eagle Newspapers bought the Lake Oswego Review, Blaha became its publisher and founded the West Linn Tidings.

In 1985, under a management agreement between the (Eugene) Guard Publishing Co. and Eagle Newspapers, Inc., he oversaw the merger of the Times Publications with theLake Oswego Review, becoming vice president and chief operating officer of that new newspaper company. He served on the board of directors of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association, becoming its president in 1988.

During the late 1980s and early 1990s he was president and chief executive officer of the Seattle-area Community Newspapers, Inc. group. He later rejoined Eagle Newspapers, serving in management capacities for the Canby Herald and Wilsonville Spokesman until his retirement last year. He was fond of saying that helping people to develop their potential was his most pleasurable achievement.

Mr. Blaha is survived by his wife, Karen two children, Steven, and his wife, Tanya, and Jennifer two stepchildren, Chris Sweet, and her husband, Rick, and Mark Lytle six grandchildren one great-grandchild and a sister, Jane of San Francisco.

Bob Van Leer

Robert R. "Bob" Van Leer died Friday, March 6, 2009, at Curry General Hospital in Gold Beach of complications from chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He was 81.

A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 14, at Bethany Lutheran Church in Gold Beach. The Rev. Tim Brueckner will officiate.

Bob was a 52-year resident of Gold Beach. He moved to Gold Beach in 1956 when he and his wife, the late Betty Van Leer, purchased the Curry County Reporter.

The Van Leers published the Reporter for 41 years before passing it on to daughter and son-in-law Molly and Jim Walker, now of Salem.

Bob was born in St. Louis MO on Aug. 28, 1927. Because of a lack of work during the Depression years, his family moved to an unoccupied farm house on property owned by an uncle, and Bob started school in a one-room schoolhouse without the benefit of electricity or indoor plumbing at school or home. When he was in the second grade, the family moved back to St. Louis.

He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1945 at the age of 17. Bob was shipped to the Philippines and assigned to a landing ship, LSM 11. He was then reassigned to a troop transport, U.S. Gilliam, APA 57, which ultimately was to be a target ship in atom bomb tests held at Bikini Atoll in the central Pacific in 1946.

After earning a bachelor of arts degree from Washington University in St. Louis, Bob entered the University of Missouri Journalism School at Columbia MO. There he met Betty Lee Templeman of Cecilia KY. They were married February 16, 1952, in Elizabethtown KY.

Bob was a specialist in newspaper ad sales and worked for dailies in Evansville IN, Sterling IL, and Eureka CA before buying the Reporter.

He was long active in professional and civic activities. Bob was president of the statewide Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association (ONPA) in 1969-70 and received the association's highest honor for a working journalist, the Amos E. Voorhies award, in 1992. In July, 2008, Bob was inducted into the Oregon Newspapers Hall of Fame, joining the others who are honored at Allen Hall at the University of Oregon. The award was presented by his son-in-law, Jim Walker, 2007-08 president of ONPA representing the Yamhill County News-Register in McMinnville.

Bob served on both elective and appointive civic boards over many years, including Curry Health District, Gold Beach Port Commission, Curry County Fair Board, Port of Gold Beach Budget Committee, Gold Beach Rotary Club, and Gold Beach Chamber of Commerce (where he served as president).

Bob and Betty traveled extensively, visiting every continent except Antarctica. Some of Bob's travel writings can be viewed at www.bobvanleer.com.

The couple celebrated their 55th wedding anniversary in February of 2007. Betty preceded Bob in death on January 23, 2008.

Bob is survived by four daughters and sons-in-law: Sherry and Scott Wills, Amy and Doug Bornemeier, Sally and Dave Shuey (all of Portland), and Molly and Jim Walker of Salem. He is also survived by six grandchildren and two granddaughters-in-law: Rob and Rebecca Johnson of Caledon, Ontario, Canada and Chris and Emily Johnson of Medford OR, sons of Molly Walker Jordan and Maya Shuey and Jon and Anna Bornemeier three great-grandchildren, Travis and Caleb Johnson, sons of Chris Johnson, and Sadie Johnson, daughter of Rob Johnson and two sisters, June Pallardy and Ruth Chiodini, both of St. Louis MO.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Curry Health Foundation, P.O. Box 1274, Gold Beach, OR 97444.

Edwina Meitzen

Edwina Meitzen of Lafayette, longtime owner of the Dayton Tribune along with her surviving husband George, died February 25, 2009 at the Willamette Valley Medical Center in McMinnville, a victim of cancer at the age of 77.

Edwina was born December 19, 1931 in Dallas TX. She learned typesetting in her parents' printing shop and earned certification as a journeyman linotype operator at the age of 18.

The Meitzens settled in Lafayette in 1962 and took jobs withThe Oregonian in Portland. Two years later, they bought theTribune and its affiliated printing shop.

The weekly newspaper had been launched in 1912 by local bankers, who saw it as a way to help the city prosper. Not being newspaper people themselves, the bankers hired a series of publishers to run the paper over the years before finally selling the enterprise to the Meitzens in 1964.

Edwina, widely known as "Eddie," served as editor of the Tribune until June 2006, when she and her husband ceased publication. The following year, they shuttered the print shop as well and went into retirement.

In addition to her lifelong career in publishing and printing, Edwina also had a long career in public service. She was appointed to the Lafayette Planning commission in 1969, then joined the city council. She became Lafayette's first woman mayor in 1973, serving until 1976. She renewed her government service in Lafayette in 1979, serving another stint on the city council in 2003-4. Most recently, she served on the city's budget committee from 2006 through 2008.

Edwina was active in the Dayon Jaycee-ettes and Dayton Chamber of Commerce. She was one of the founders of Lafayette Heritage Days and served as festival queen in 1999. And she was a SMART reading volunteer at Dayton Elementary School.

In addition to George, her husband of 49 years, she is survived by two sons, Charles and Edwin Kratzer of Lafayette a daughter, Colleen Steckel of Ohio a sister, Alicia Anderson of Chesterfield MO two brothers, Robert Fitzgerald of Irving TX and Howard Fitzgerald of Garland TX and five grandchildren.

Mark H. Dickson

Mark H. Dickson of Tillamook, an Oregon newspaperman for 18 years, died December 28, 2008, from complications following emergency surgery. He was 62.

Mark was born and raised in the Mt. Tabor area of southeast Portland, and his childhood was notable for unusual pets: at various times, a monkey, a skunk, and a crow. His parents ran Dickson Drug Company on SE Stark, a business his grandfather started in the early 1900s.

After graduating from the University of Oregon in 1968 with a bachelors degree in political science, Mark married Barbara Lynn Winters, and the couple moved to British Columbia shortly thereafter. While in Canada, they had two sons, Maris and Matt. Mark supported his family by working in management, first for the Simpson-Sears Company in Victoria, and later for Wilson Stationers, Ltd. in Vancouver. At the height of his management career, he was in charge of eight Wilson Stationers stores.

Barbara died in the early 1970s, and in 1975 Mark left Canada and spent a few months traveling with his two sons. They settled in Seaside OR, and Mark took a job as a reporter for the Seaside Signal. He quickly worked his way up to general manager and held that position for several years. He resigned in 1981 to become the north Oregon coast corerspondent for The Oregonian, and he also wrote freelance articles for other publications.

Mark married Betty Duncan of Seaside in 1983. That same year, Swift Newspapers created a new publishing company called Pacific Coast Newspapers, which was the parent company for the Tillamook Headlight-Herald, the Seaside Signal, and the Lincoln City News Guard. Mark was named publisher of this newspaper group, and he and Betty moved to Tillamook. There they had a daughter (Holly) at the end of 1983 and a son (McKinley) in the fall of 1990.

Mark remained as publisher of the three newspapers for nine years, during three of which (1989-1991) he served on the ONPA Board of Directors. He left the newspaper business for good in 1992 and became involved in politics and public enterprises.

Around 2002, Mark began assisting his mother and stepfather (Edward Venini) operating Dickson Drug, and he helped them convert it from a pharmacy to an over-the-counter drug, convenience, and gift store. After his mother died in 2006, Mark helped with the sale and clearing of the store property. His stepfather died in early 2008.

Brian T. Meehan

Brian Meehan, reporter, sportswriter, and columnist for The Oregonian for nearly 20 years, died Tuesday in Tacoma WA of complications following heart surgery. He was 57.

Meehan's early journalism career included the Morristown (NJ) Daily Record, the Harrisburg (PA) Patriot News, and then the Hartford (CT) Courant, where he rose to the rank of assistant managing editor.

He moved his family west in 1989 to join The Oregonian as a reporter, covering the environment and natural resource issues. In the early '90s, he began coaching youth sports in his off hours. In 1999, after winning numerous reporting and writing awards, he moved to the Oregonian sports department as a columnist. Not long after that, he also moved to a houseboat on the Columbia near Scappoose.

Although primarily a sportswriter, Meehan was selected in 2003 to be one of the Oregonian reporters embedded with U.S. troops early in the invasion of Iraq. According to executive editor Peter Bhatia, "His maturity, clear-headed thinking and ability to tell stories is why we chose him to go to Iraq. . It is indicative of the extraordinary journalist he was."

Meehan played college basketball at Hofstra, but his most beloved sport was baseball. Oregonian columnist Steve Duin writes, "Brian Meehan was a brilliant, expressive writer, but he was more suited, I always thought, to being a coach than a columnist in this troubled age because he was so determined to put the players and their games in the best possible light."

Meehan is survived by his wife Elissa, a daughter and two sons, his mother, two brothers and a sister.

Margaret Ann "Peggy" Stickel

Peggy, as she was known to family and friends, died peacefully in her home, surrounded by loved ones, on Saturday, May 31, at 3:40pm.

Born Margaret Ann Dunne August 13, 1922, in Weehawken NJ, Peggy was one of seven daughters and two sons born to Jane and Patrick Dunne. She attended Weehawken High School, where she was voted most popular, best looking, and best dancer. She graduated in 1940, attended John Robert Powers Modeling School, and worked for a couple of years as a fashion model in New York City's garment district. She later worked as an executive secretary in the New York office of the Erie Railroad.

In December 1941, Peggy and a couple of classmates were walking home after a high school reunion dance in Weehawken when a car pulled alongside. It was a frigid night, and the driver of the car asked if anyone wanted a ride. Peggy and her girlfriend said yes.

That brief encounter was the beginning of Peggy's lifelong love affair with the car's driver, Fred Stickel. They were engaged in May 1943 and married in December of that year. Three weeks later, Fred shipped out with the Marines to the Pacific Theater, and Peggy lived at home with her family in Weehawken.

After the war, the young couple settled in Hoboken NJ. Fred Jr. was born in 1946, followed by Patrick in 1950 and Daisy in 1952. The family moved to Wood-Ridge NJ in 1954, where Geoffrey was born in 1957, James in 1958, and Bridget in 1960. That year, the family moved to West Orange NJ. Seven years later, Fred was transferred to Portland, where he subsequently became publisher of The Oregonian.

Peggy devoted her every minute to her children and husband. She became very active at St. Cecilia Parish and kept physicaly fit through exercise at the Multnomah Athletic Club. She was a member of Waverley Country Club and a past member of the Town Club.

She is survived by her husband Fred daughters Daisy Medici and Bridget Otto sons Fred Jr., Patrick, Geoffrey, and James sister Rosemay McGinty brother Donald Dunne ten grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

A funeral Mass was held Wednesday, June 4, in St. Cecilia Catholic Church in Beaverton. Remembrances may be sent to the St. Cecilia Catholic Church Campaign Fund.

Philip N. Bladine

Philip N. "Phil" Bladine, a lifelong Oregon newspaperman, died peacefully April 16, 2008, at Hillside Retirement Communities in McMinnville. He was 89.

Phil was born Nov. 19, 1918, in Cedar Falls, Iowa, the younger of two sons of Lars and Inez Waterman Bladine. In 1928, Lars purchased the Telephone-Register in McMinnville, and his elder son Jack went there to begin family operation of the paper. Lars moved the rest of the family to McMinnville in 1932.

Phil graduated from McMinnville High School in 1936 and, after a year at Linfield College, attended the University of Oregon School of Journalism, earning a bachelor's degree in 1940. He joined the Navy immediately, but resigned and returned home to help with the family newspaper after Lars died in 1941. He re-enlisted following the Pearl Harbor attack and, except for his 1943 marriage to Margaret "Meg" Greene of San Angelo TX, remained on active duty throughout World War II, serving as the executive officer on a "landing ship tank" (LST) that carried beach landing craft.

In 1945, Phil returned to McMinnville and became editor of the Telephone-Register.In 1948, he and Jack built radio station KMCM (now KLYC), and in 1953 they purchased the News-Reporter and merged it with the Telephone-Register to form the News-Register. After Jack died in 1957, Phil became News-Register publisher and co-owner with Jack's widow, the late Gayle Hunter Bladine, and later with their children.

During the 1950s, Phil briefly owned the Headlight-Herald in Tillamook and the North Lincoln News Guard (now the News Guard) in Lincoln City, and during the late 1960s and early 1970s he owned the Milwaukie Review (now the Clackamas Review) and theSellwood Bee. In 1960, he joined with the Hillsboro Argus and Times Publications of Forest Grove to build Tualatin-Yamhill Press, one of the earliest web printing plants.

Phil served as editor of the News-Register until 1974, president until 1983, and publisher until 1991, turning each title over to his son Jeb as he stepped back. While he was editor and publisher, as well as in the years since, Phil's newspapers won a great many state and national awards. And together, father and son turned the company's print division, Oregon Lithoprint, into a regional provider of high-quality web printing.

Phil served the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association for decades, including 20-plus years as its legislative chair. He was ONPA president in 1959-60, and he received the ONPA President's Award for service to journalism in 1971 and 1973 and the Roger Williams Freedom of Information Award in 1987.

In 1974 he received ONPA's highest honor, the Amos E. Voorhies Award, and in 2001 was inducted into the Oregon Newspaper Hall of Fame.

Betty Van Leer

Betty Van Leer, for 41 years owner and co-publisher of the Curry County Reporter in Gold Beach, died of pulmonary disease January 23, 2008, at Providence Hospital in Medford.

Betty was born in Louisville KY in 1930 and lived her early life in Cecilia KY. After graduating from Stephens College (a two-year women's college in Columbia MO), she attended the University of Missouri, where she earned her BA in journalism and met Bob Van Leer. She and Bob were married in 1952, the year Betty graduated.

Betty worked as an editor at The Daily Gazette in Sterling IL for a short time before she and Bob moved to Eureka CA. In 1956, the couple purchased the Curry County Reporter in Gold Beach and moved there from Eureka. Betty and her husband worked as a team publishing the paper.

In 1997, after 41 years publishing the Curry County Reporter, Betty and Bob handed the newspaper over to their daughter Molly and son-in-law Jim Walker. The Walkers published the paper for 10 years before selling it to Joel Summer in 2007.

Besides the newspaper business, Betty was a state and national expert on button collecting and had an extensive collection. She was a member and judge of the Oregon State Button Society and the National Button Society and attended and judged at the annual meetings of both.

Betty Anderson

Betty Anderson, a co-owner of the Drain Enterprise since 1950 and its publisher since 1992, died November 19, 2007, at the age of 80.

She was born Betty Gregg in Lincoln NB on November 6, 1927. Her parents moved to Salem OR when Betty was a child. After graduating from Salem High School in 1946, Betty went to work for the Oregon Statesman,where she met Lowell Anderson. When Betty and Lowell were married in May 1950, Lowell and his father bought the Drain Enterprise. The whole family moved to Drain, and the newspaper became the family business.

Lowell Anderson served as editor and publisher of the paper until his death in 1992, when Betty took over as publisher. Her daughter, Sue Anderson, took on the editorial tasks, and the two shared advertising duties.

Sue Anderson is now owner and publisher of the Drain Enterprise. Betty is survived by three children: Sue and Mark of Drain, and Jo of Dallas OR.


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